Mumbai University results: 3.25 lakh answer sheets yet to be evaluated

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While the Mumbai University (MU) has scheduled the result declaration date for the undergraduate courses today, that is, July 31, it seems the varsity will miss the deadline. Of the 477 examinations that the MU conducted in March and April this year, the results of 340 courses are pending. Even as officials are hopeful of declaring most results on Monday, the deadline set by the governor and chancellor Ch Vidyasagar Rao, a whopping 3.25 lakh answer sheets are yet to be evaluated. Over a lakh papers are to be moderated.

In Commerce stream alone, over 2.63 lakh papers are to be assessed. Monday marks the end of non-instructional days, which means assessors will have to evaluate papers and take classes.

Even as the university is hopeful of declaring all Arts, Science, Technology and Management results by July 31, it is likely that some of these results will miss the deadline. Commerce and law results will spill over to the rest of the week.

As per a press statement, the Mumbai University has received the help of the universities of Nagpur, Pune, Aurangabad and Kolhapur, and the speed of the work has accelerated. “Of the total 17,36,145 answer sheets, 90 per cent have been evaluated and 3,25,305 answer sheets will be evaluated soon,” it said.

The delay in the MU results was also raised in the ongoing monsoon session of the legislature recently. The meeting on July 28 was chaired by Nimbalkar and attended by Education Minister Vinod Tawde, MLCs Hemant Takle, Dhananjay Munde and Anil Parab among others.

Munch on: Here are 7 healthy yet delicious snacks for each day of the week

Baked potato chips are healthier than fried chips.

There’s a common perception that diet food is boring. But that’s not true. You can eat healthy without compromising on taste, and yes, that includes low calorie desserts too. Diet food contains fewer calories, and serves as a healthier alternative to conventional snacks such as potato chips, burgers and other fast food. Some diet foods are full of antioxidants, essential nutrients. Experts at salebhai.com list some of the healthy diet snacks and food that could be consumed on different days of the week.

* Mondays: Diet chivda is a mixed snack popular across India and served with hot beverages. It is made of ingredients such as flattened rice, dried peas, raisins, and so on. Available in different combinations, diet chivda is an excellent healthy treat as most of the ingredients are either dried or baked, and contain little to no oil or fat.

* Tuesdays: While fried potato chips top the list of unhealthy foods in the world, its diet version is the opposite, without compromising on taste. Diet potato chips are mostly baked and use little to no oil, and make for a yummy snack between meals.

* Wednesdays: Chira (flattened rice) is the main ingredient in poha. When lightly roasted, it can be mixed with various spices and consumed as a healthy snack throughout the day.

Granola bars are loved by gym-goers. (Shutterstock)

* Thursdays: A container of masala chickpeas packs several vitamins, minerals, dietary fibre and protein, keeping one fuller for longer.

* Fridays: Quinoa has become popular over the years both as a superfood and a versatile ingredient. Native to South America, it is prepared by being boiled in water. The nutrient-rich grain is mostly consumed as part of a salad, but there are treats such as quinoa puffs that are equally healthy and delicious.

* Saturdays: A favourite among gym goers and fitness aficionados, muesli or granola bars are the perfect choice that also boost metabolism. A great alternative to candy bars, they can satiate anyone’s sweet tooth or sudden cravings without any adverse effects to health. Muesli bars are made up of refined flour, hazelnut, cashew, almond, dark chocolate, honey, oats, butter, and sugar.

* Sunday: Although a new entrant in the list of healthiest foods, kale chips have quickly become one of the most tried new ingredients in the global food market. A close cousin of the cabbage family, kale has a high fibre content and low calories, making it a great diet food.

Delhi University colleges announce fifth cutoff, 10% seats left for those yet to make the cut

Delhi University colleges released the fifth cutoff list for admissions on Monday, which saw most sought-after colleges close admissions to popular course choices.

With only about 10% of the seats still up for grabs, the cutoffs for the few seats that are still available at these colleges for the some of the more popular course choices has not dipped by more than a mark or two.

COMMERCE AND ECONOMICS:

Economics (Hons) has seen a dip of upto 3.5% points at Lakshmibai College, but is closed for admissions at most sought-after colleges such as Hans Raj College, and Indraprastha College for Women (IP College) in the fifth list. However, few seats have now become available at colleges such as Kirori Mal College (KMC) after withdrawals, where the cutoff is set at 96.5%.

Seats are still available at colleges like Ramjas College, Daulat Ram College, and Hindu College. Hindu College has set the highest cutoff for the course at 97.25%, which is the same as that in the fourth list.

Under the fifth list, BCom (Hons) has now closed at Ramjas College and Sri Venkateswara as well. However, the seats are still available at IP College, Gargi, Kamala Nehru and others. Most well known colleges have not reduced their cutoffs by more than 0.5% points.

Seats are still available at colleges like Ramjas College, Daulat Ram College, and Hindu College. Hindu College has set the highest cutoff for the course at 97.25%, which is the same as that in the fourth list.

HUMANITIES:

BA English (Hons) is now available again after withdrawals in colleges such as Hans Raj College and Kalindi College. It has, however, closed at Lady Shri Ram College (LSR), Ramjas College, and Maitreyi College under the fifth list.

The cutoffs for English (Hons) has also dropped by upto 3.5% points. The highest cutoff for English is at Miranda House, where the cutoff requirement is 95.75%, which is 0.5% points lower than that of the fourth list.

For History aspirants, seats have become available in the fifth list after withdrawals at colleges such as Kamala Nehru College, and the cutoff has dropped by up to 4% points. The highest cutoff for History is at LSR, which is the same as that in the fourth list, at 96.25%.

Seats for Political Science are also available at certain colleges such as Kamala Nehru College, Gargi College, and Ramjas College. Though the cutoff has dropped by up to 3% points, it has not dropped by more than a mark or two in most sought-after colleges that still have seats available. Ramjas has the highest cutoff with a requirement of 94.75%, which is only 0.25% points lower than the fourth list.

BA Programme is closed at most well known colleges. However, some such as IP College, Ramjas College, and Miranda House have a few seats remaining, with a cutoff requirement of 88.5%, 91.5%, and 93.25% respectively.

SCIENCES:

Chemistry (Hons) is still available at colleges like Gargi, Kalindi, and Hans Raj. However, the cutoff requirements have not dropped by more than 1% point.

IP College, Gargi, and Kamala Nehru have reopened admissions to Mathematics (Hons) after withdrawals.

Yet Another Benefit of the Mediterranean Diet: It May Cut Cancer Risk by 86%

Consuming a Mediterranean diet – rich in fruits and fish – while decreasing the intake of soft drinks may help prevent the risk of developing colorectal cancer by nearly 86 per cent, suggests a new study. Colorectal cancer develops from intestinal polyps and has been linked to a low-fibre diet heavy on red meat, alcohol and high-calorie foods.

 

“We found that each one of these three choices was associated with a little more than 30 per cent reduced odds of a person having an advanced, pre-cancerous colorectal lesion, compared to people who did not eat any of the Mediterranean diet components,” said Naomi Fliss Isakov from Tel-Aviv Medical Centre, in Israel.

 

“Among people who made all three healthy choices the benefit was compounded to almost 86 per cent reduced odds,” Isakov added.

 

For the study, presented at the ESMO 19th World Congress on Gastrointestinal Cancer, the team included 808 people who were undergoing screening or diagnostic colonoscopies who were between 40 and 70 years old and had adhered to a Mediterranean diet.

balanced diet

A typical Mediterranean diet was defined as consumption levels above the group median for fruits, vegetables and legumes, nuts and seeds, whole grains, fish and poultry and a high ratio of monounsaturated to saturated fatty acids, as well as consumption below the median of red meat, alcohol, and soft drinks.

 

Consumption of even two to three components of the diet, compared to none, was associated with half the odds of advanced polyps, the study showed.