A Tale of two chillies

nagaland kitchen dilli haat, dilli haat, northeastern food, northeastern food delhi, northeastern food dilli haat, smoke house deli, smoke house deli peri peri chicken, food news, delhi food news

Shaded from both the sunlight and the moon’s glow by leafy branches, the occupied tables scattered outside the Nagaland Kitchen in Dilli Haat are invariably laden with two items: the ubiquitous momos and an innocuous reddish-brown curry served with a bowl of steamed rice. Despite its watery appearance, the dish, Pork with Raja Mircha, a chilly native to the Northeast, is as fiery as the belly of a dragon, which is no surprise given that the raja mircha, known as bhut jolokia in Assamese, is one of the spiciest chillies in the world. People take a bite, gasp, chew, gasp some more, and then keep eating, usually washed down with copious amounts of fruit beer.

It was from these government sanctioned surroundings, that the cult of the raja mircha spread, first to Northeastern eateries such as Nagaland’s Kitchen and Rosaang Cafe, and then appearing in supporting roles at cafes such as Cafe Lota, ranging from traditional curries and roasts to contrivances such as Bhut Jolokia Tandoori Chicken Drumsticks at Oh My God Cafe, Delhi. And now after a finger-licking Raja Mircha Pork appeared on the menu of Delhi’s Masala Library by Jiggs Kalra, the first instance of it in an establishment restaurant. With this, the raja mircha has arrived, and it’s been a long time coming.

But first, we have got to thank the Portuguese. Apart from their contributions to the fields of cartography and generally discovering the world, the nation of navigators disseminated a cornucopia of crops across the globe, for example introducing chillies to India at the then Portuguese colony of Goa in the 15th century. After spicing up the beach state, the piquant pod scattered its seeds across the length and breadth of the country, growing and diversifying into a sort of capsaicin kaleidoscope over the centuries, including varieties like the bhut jolokia, and became an integral part of our cuisine, nay, diet.

Meanwhile, a far more recent conquest has been by the piri piri or peri peri, the African bird’s eye chilli, which was brought to the dark continent from South America by, you guessed it, the Portuguese. Like the bhut jolokia in the Northeast, the peri peri became essential to various African cuisines, including that of South Africa. So when South African-based Portuguese restaurant brand Nando’s, famed for their Peri Peri Chicken, opened shop in India a few years ago, it was little surprise that peri peri was suddenly en vogue, graduating to a staple Continental seasoning once Indians found it suitably hot.

Smoke House Deli was one of the first restaurants to introduce peri peri in their menus in Delhi and Mumbai by rubbing it on grilled chicken and preceding Nando’s by three years. Today, a peri peri chicken or white fish is almost de rigueur on any decent European menu.

According to Smoke House Deli Brand Chef Shamsul Wahid, peri peri works because it has just the right balance. “It’s not as intense as a bhut jolokia nor as mild as a jalapeno, it’s somewhere in the middle. It also combines well with garlic and olive oil, which makes for a great marinade. That being said, it needs room to play so it has to be the star ingredient of a dish, too many other elements will spoil the balance,” he says. What makes it most attractive to chefs though is its consistency. “Even buying local chillies is a bit of a gamble because their heat levels vary greatly, while the peri peri is uniform in its intensity, ensuring that dishes maintain their consistency, something vital to restaurants,” says Wahid, “Also, I think people just really like the name.”

7 succumb to H1N1 and lepto in first two weeks of July in Mumbai

With the monsoon gaining momentum, infectious diseases too have spiralled in the city. Seven people have succumbed to H1N1 influenza and leptospirosis in the first two weeks of July, while hundreds have been affected by suspected dengue and gastroenteritis. Cholera too has made a comeback.The H1N1influenza, widely circulating since June, claimed five lives, including that of a four-year-old child from Mankhurd, in July. Worryingly, a delay in treatment with the antiviral oseltamivir contributed to four of the five deaths, BMC said on Monday .

The city’s death toll for the viral infection now stands at 14, including nine deaths in June.In Maharashtra, deaths caused by H1N1 crossed 300 on Sunday .More than 65% victims has underlying conditions such as diabetes, hypertension and obesity. Four adults who died from the city had at least one chronic condition. While two of the deceased had hypothyroidism, the other two were known cases of hypertension.

“H1N1 is predominant among all other seasonal infections circulating in the country . Maharashtra, Kerala and Gujarat have contributed to more than 70% of the 600 odd deaths nationally . Tamil Nadu and Karnataka are lea ding in cases. But we understand little about its severity compared with regular flu,” said Dr AC Dhariwal, director of the Delhi-based National Centre for Disease Control (NCDC). An NCDC team, which toured the state in June to review deaths, had pointed to a “considerable delay” in initiating treatment in patients with co-morbid conditions as the prime reason for the high fatality rate.

As per the civic report, among the latest victims was a 57-year-old man from Bandra who had a history of diabetes and hypertension. He died after developing bilateral pneu monia and multi-organ failure. All other victims were women, including a 65-year-old Parel resident, a patient of hypertension. She died of bilateral pneumonia and sepsis following the H1N1infection.

A 41-year-old woman from Borivli (W), a known case of hypothyroidism, died after developing acute respiratory distress syndrome. The third deceased too, a 45-year-old woman from Goregaon, had hypothyroidism.State epidemiologist Dr Pradeep Awate said most deaths were recorded in the 22-50 age group this year. The 4-year-old child was treated in three hospitals before succumbing in a public hospital.

ICAI CA result 2017: Two Mumbaikars among top three national rank holders

Two Mumbaikars are among the top three rankers at the final Chartered Accountancy (CA) exam that was held in May 2017.

Dombivali’s Raj Sheth, 22, topped the exam nationally with an aggregate score of 78.75% (630 out of 800 marks) and Krishna Gupta, 22, ranked third.

“I’m very happy to clear the exam in the first attempt. I have started working with a firm for my articleship and plan to study further before looking for a job,” said Sheth, who graduated in BCom from R A Podar College in 2016 with 87%. His father retired from a diamond industry job some years ago and his two older sisters are in the service industry.

Sheth plans to study in the insurance and finance market for another year before finding a suitable job. “My family is ecstatic,” he says.

Gupta, whose father is a CA also attempted the exam for the first time. The Goregaon resident who lives with his parents and older sister, said, “Since I was studying for BCom as well as CA exams simultaneously, I left Narsee Monjee College after my second year and joined Patkar College instead, since it was closer home. This gave me more time to focus on CA .”

Raj Sheth and Krishna Gupta are from Mumbai and ranked  first and third, respectively in the CA exam. The second rank was bagged by Vellore’s Agasthiwaran S.

Of the 79,851 candidates who appeared for the final CA tests, 10,276 cleared the exam. The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India (ICAI), which announced the results on July 18, said that 41,373 candidates appeared for Group I test in CA finals, of which 13.82% passed the test whereas of the 38,478 candidates who appeared for the Group II test, 16.2% passed. 34,503 candidates appeared for both groups and 22.98% cleared both tests.

The second all India rank was bagged by Vellore’s Agasthiwaran S who scored 75.25% (602/800).

Exclusive: CBSE plans Class 10, 12 Board exams on same date in two shifts

The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) proposes to hold the finals for classes 10 and 12 on same dates in two shifts, a move that will reduce the examination period and give teachers extra time to check answer-scripts more thoroughly.

The new plan was designed after the board met principals of some of the top schools in New Delhi and its satellite cities.

The CBSE, which has two panels committees to suggest ways to improve the system, will review the suggestions before a final decision is taken.

The country’s largest school board that has more than 18,000 institutions affiliated to it holds the two exams usually from March 1, barring exceptions such as this year’s state assembly elections that delayed the test by more than a week.

The exams run close to 45 days because of an array of subjects and separate time-tables for the two classes.

The plan to set common dates for both exams, with Class 12 in the morning and Class 10 in the afternoon, is likely to decrease the overall duration of the finals.

At present, exams are not held in the afternoon.

The reduced number of exam days will give evaluators — a pool of schoolteachers selected by the CBSE — more time to check the answer-scripts of students before the results are declared in May.

Students of Class 12 during the first day of CBSE exam at an exam centre, in Blue Bells Model School, Sector-4, in Gurgaon, India.

The teachers usually get a small window to check the answers, given the sheer size of the number of examinees.

More than a million students wrote the Class 12 exam this year.

“By conducting Class 12 and 10 exams on the same day we can reduce the examination period and provide more time to the evaluators,” a senior board official said.

The CBSE has drawn criticism for its evaluation system as several students complained of variation in marks after asking the board for a relook.

The board said it took extra care to cut faults, but the possibility of human error cannot be ruled out in calculating the marks, putting them on answer-scripts and feeding them manually in computers.

“Efforts are made to further improve the system,” the official said. The meeting with principals was called to gather views “before deciding anything on the evaluation and examination system”, the official said.

According to sources, most principals were against reevaluation or rechecking of answer-scripts, but won’t mind verification of marks.

“A longer evaluation period will be better for students. This will give teachers more time to look at the answer sheets, maybe more teachers can look at them. This will ensure fewer errors,” a principal said.

Another principal said “we have assured the board we will send our best teachers” to check answers.

It has also been suggested that the board should ask students to suggest teachers who could be good evaluators. Another suggestion is to increase the remuneration of evaluators, at least by 20%, and to set a figure as to how many copies they need to check.

“We are looking at restricting the number of copies that can be evaluated by a person in six hours so that quality is maintained,” the CBSE official said.

World’s toughest maths competition: Two UK girls to make rare appearance on a platform for brainy boys

The rarefied world of international mathematics competitions has traditionally been where brainy teenage boys show their genius for problem solving.

This year however, for the first time in a quarter of a century, two girls have made it into the UK squad for the International Mathematical Olympiad , the largest, oldest and most prestigious of international maths contests.

The competition starts next week in Rio de Janeiro, when 17-year-old Rosie Cates from Cambridge will become the first female in the six-strong UK team for almost a decade. Naomi Wei, also 17 and from London, is one of the four reserves.

Cates has been on the team selectors’ radar for some years as she puzzled her way through the junior leagues, but earlier this year a near-perfect performance in the European Girls’ Mathematical Olympiad signalled her arrival on the world stage.

She dropped just one point against her Ukrainian rival (who achieved a perfect 42/42) and went on to secure a place on an IMO team that is likely to be one of the strongest the UK has fielded.

gold star trophy on gold background

“This year is likely to be peak UK for some time,” said the UK team leader, Geoff Smith , who has been monitoring Cates’s progress for years as part of his wider remit to improve representation of girls in the world’s toughest maths competitions. Currently they make up just 10% of competitors.

Smith is unwilling to speculate as to why there are fewer girls than boys, but one contentious theory is that teenage girls are more emotionally mature and are more likely to be engaged in social networks and friendship groups, while boys of the same age may be more introverted and more likely to find an outlet in the world of mathematical challenges.

As one commentator put it: “Some of the boys who are really good are well-grounded, normal human beings with normal interests and friendships. But it’s true that some of the boys taking part are socially withdrawn and a small number are on the autistic spectrum. In order to do maths, it’s unnecessary to have any emotional maturity. You just need to be able to reason.”

Cates can certainly reason. She is also good at netball, playing for school and town clubs. She sings in the school choir, plays the cello and is in the middle of her Duke of Edinburgh gold award: her training expedition in the Brecon Beacons starts a few hours after she lands back from Brazil.

“Rosie has made her way into the IMO team by becoming stronger very quickly,” said Smith. “She really announced herself at EGMO 2016 when she won a gold medal with 35/42, and then in 2017 she won gold again with a remarkable 41/42.” She is also the only girl ever to have represented the UK in the Romanian Master of Mathematics competition, where the problems are notoriously difficult.

The IMO is yet another step up. It is the world cup of maths contests, attracting the most gifted young mathematicians from more than 100 countries. Each team sends up to six competitors – all pre-university – who sit two papers on consecutive days, each lasting four-and-a-half hours and featuring three problems, each worth seven points.

Cates, who has been offered a place to read maths at Trinity College, Cambridge, in the autumn, is nervous but excited. “I really enjoy the problem-solving aspect of Olympiad maths. Often you can solve a problem without using particularly advanced techniques, but you have to be creative about the way you use them.

“I really like it when you’ve been trying to do a problem and you get it, and it just clicks into place. That’s a really nice feeling,” said Cates, who has just taken A-levels in double maths, physics, chemistry and French at Hills Road state sixth form college.

Naomi Wei, a student at City of London girls’ school, said few girls reach the final selection stages for the IMO, let alone make it to the competition. “I think the reason for this is school culture. In school, girls good at maths or even Stem [science, technology, engineering and mathematics] subjects are not cool: most girls like to choose to study humanity subjects, such as music, art, drama, and classics. We should encourage more girls into challenging maths.”

According to Cates, girls-only competitions like the EGMO and the UK Mathematical Olympiad for Girls are helping. “There are more girls coming through. It’s definitely improving.”

Geoff Smith is more circumspect. “The whole idea of EGMO is that it will provide a context in which strong young female mathematicians can flourish. I wish I could say that it has been an unqualified success, and that there are lots of girls queueing up to take places in future IMO teams. So far, that is not the case, but I live in hope.”

Last year the UK came joint-seventh in the country rankings at the IMO, equal-top with Russia among European teams and first in the EU by some margin. On the UK team’s chances of IMO success this year, Smith said: “The only teams in the top 10 last year which were not from the far east were the US , Russia and the UK.

“Like the weather forecaster who knows that you do pretty well by predicting that the weather tomorrow will be like the weather today, my tip is that the USA and China will be competing for the top spot. The South Koreans also look very good this year. Let’s hope for another great performance by the UK team.

“At the moment we have an unusually strong UK IMO team. Much as I would like to believe otherwise, this will not always be the case. We are lucky to have an exceptionally talented generation of students.”

Enjoy the goodness of strawberries with these two delightful recipes

Strawberries with whipped cream or chocolate syrup is always a favourite. But don’t you ever want to move ahead and try something new in your kitchen? Simply watching MasterChef won’t help you. You need to get out there and try your hands at making something new. These recipes by Chef Jitendra Upadhyay, Pastry Chef, Renaissance Lucknow Hotel are worth trying. You will thank us once you master it.

tart-759

Fresh Strawberry Tart with Mascarpone Cream

Ingredients
For the Tart base
100g – Unsalted butter
50g – Icing/ Confectioners’ sugar
1 pinch – Salt
2 tbsp – Milk
150g – All-purpose flour
A few drops of vanilla extract

For the Mascarpone Cream filling
100g – Whipped topping cream
100g – Mascarpone cheese
A few drops of vanilla extract

For the Fruit topping and garnish
Fresh strawberries
Chocolate /Nuts (Optional)

Method
* Sieve flour and salt together and keep it aside.

* Cream butter and sugar in small bowl.

* Make the dough for the tart by mixing all the ingredients and keep it in the refrigerator for an hour.

* Remove dough from the refrigerator, roll it out and place it into a greased tart pan. Press it down and up the sides until it is even. Refrigerate tart for at least 10-15 mins.

* Preheat oven to 170 degree celsius. Remove tart from the refrigerator, dock it with a fork and bake for 15-18 mins.

* Allow to cool completely before filling.

* Make the filling by mixing all the ingredients carefully with a spatula and cover the insides of the tart with it.

* Garnish the tart with fresh strawberry/chocolate/sliced pistachio.

strawberry-chocolate-brownies

Strawberry Chocolate Brownies

Ingredients
250g – Dark chocolate
250g – Unsalted butter
360g – Caster sugar
5 – Eggs
5ml – Vanilla extracts
100g – Strawberry chocolate (chopped)
50g – Chopped nuts
65g – All-purpose flour
1 tsp – Baking powder

For Garnish
Fresh strawberries
Vanilla ice cream
Chocolate garnish

Method
Preheat the oven to 170 degree celsius.

* Line a 24cm square baking tin with greaseproof paper.

* Melt the dark chocolate and butter into a large bowl and place it on a pan of simmering water.

* Sift the flour and baking powder in a separate bowl and add nuts and strawberry chocolate chunks to it.

* Beat the eggs and sugar until you reach a silky consistency.

* Beat the eggs and add the chocolate mixer and all the dry ingredients to it.

* Pour the brownie mix into the greased baking tin.

* Bake at 180 degree celsius for 25-30 mins.

* Allow to cool, then cut into chunky squares.

* Serve with vanilla ice cream and fresh strawberries.

Students completing MBBS in Haryana to serve for two years in govt hospitals

Chandigarh Students completing MBBS studies from government medical colleges in Haryana will now have to put in compulsory service for two years at state-run hospitals.

Health minister Anil Vij has said this will help minimise shortage of doctors in the state. He was presiding over a meeting of the Haryana Medical Education and Research Department on Thursday.

An official release quoted the minister as saying that “Around 800 doctors from four government hospitals will be available in two years.”

He also disclosed that seats at the dental college of the Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Science in Rohtak had been increased from 60 to 100.

The Haryana government is considering various options to minimise shortage of doctors in the state.

This decision will help improve the availability of dentists in Haryana .

Union Health Minister J P Nadda would be the chief guest at the foundation stone laying ceremony of the Government Medical College in Bhiwani.

About a request by the officials of the Gold Field Medical College in Faridabad to bring it under the ambit of the state, Vij said the matter would be placed before the chief minister for a decision.

A Tale Of Two DWTS Weddings: Julianne Hough Vs. Peta Murgatroyd

They may compete on the dance floor but clearly the competition doesn’t stop there. Over the weekend, Dancing With The Stars hunk Maksim Chmerkovskiy married the beautiful Peta Murgatroyd at a breathtaking castle out on Long Island. Unfortunately, dancing co-star Julianne Hough didn’t RSVP “attending” because she was a little busy getting married to Brooks Laich, Canadian ice hockey player. Let’s take a walk down the aisle and decide who wins the Mirrorball Trophy this round.

Location! Location! Location!

Max and Peta opted for a fairytale wedding and tied the knot at the beautiful Oheka Castle. Julianne and hubby Brooks decided to keep it nice and intimate out in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho.

Verdict: Max and Peta’s Disney movie wedding wins in our book! Because you can never go wrong with a castle.

The Dress

The Dress

Julianne wore a custom Marchesa gown at the altar while Peta WOWed guests with her off-the-shoulder, multi-tiered Karen Sabag Couture ball gown.

Verdict: Custom Marchesa for the win here!

The Groom

The Groom

Brooks decided to leave his gear at home and went with a classic black and white tuxedo. Maks thought the bride shouldn’t be the only one wearing white at this party and went with a slimming white tux.

Verdict: Both men looked so dapper but we love a traditionalist – Brooks!

Squad vs. Squad

Julianna

Julianne’s squad pre-gamed with the couple in Lake Couer d’Alene, while Peta and Maks threw a pool after-bash. Needless to say, both events made some waves.

Verdict: Both bashes required inflatable swans, but lakes are gross. Maks and Peta!

The Winners

The Kiss

The final score?! It’s a tie! Both brides looked as gorgeous as ever and did their big days their own way.

Because when it comes to weddings, it’s never a competition!

Students completing MBBS in Haryana to serve for two years in govt hospitals

Chandigarh Students completing MBBS studies from government medical colleges in Haryana will now have to put in compulsory service for two years at state-run hospitals.

Health minister Anil Vij has said this will help minimise shortage of doctors in the state. He was presiding over a meeting of the Haryana Medical Education and Research Department on Thursday.

An official release quoted the minister as saying that “Around 800 doctors from four government hospitals will be available in two years.”

He also disclosed that seats at the dental college of the Post-Graduate Institute of Medical Science in Rohtak had been increased from 60 to 100.

The Haryana government is considering various options to minimise shortage of doctors in the state.

This decision will help improve the availability of dentists in Haryana .

Union Health Minister J P Nadda would be the chief guest at the foundation stone laying ceremony of the Government Medical College in Bhiwani.

About a request by the officials of the Gold Field Medical College in Faridabad to bring it under the ambit of the state, Vij said the matter would be placed before the chief minister for a decision.