Delhi University colleges announce fifth cutoff, 10% seats left for those yet to make the cut

Delhi University colleges released the fifth cutoff list for admissions on Monday, which saw most sought-after colleges close admissions to popular course choices.

With only about 10% of the seats still up for grabs, the cutoffs for the few seats that are still available at these colleges for the some of the more popular course choices has not dipped by more than a mark or two.

COMMERCE AND ECONOMICS:

Economics (Hons) has seen a dip of upto 3.5% points at Lakshmibai College, but is closed for admissions at most sought-after colleges such as Hans Raj College, and Indraprastha College for Women (IP College) in the fifth list. However, few seats have now become available at colleges such as Kirori Mal College (KMC) after withdrawals, where the cutoff is set at 96.5%.

Seats are still available at colleges like Ramjas College, Daulat Ram College, and Hindu College. Hindu College has set the highest cutoff for the course at 97.25%, which is the same as that in the fourth list.

Under the fifth list, BCom (Hons) has now closed at Ramjas College and Sri Venkateswara as well. However, the seats are still available at IP College, Gargi, Kamala Nehru and others. Most well known colleges have not reduced their cutoffs by more than 0.5% points.

Seats are still available at colleges like Ramjas College, Daulat Ram College, and Hindu College. Hindu College has set the highest cutoff for the course at 97.25%, which is the same as that in the fourth list.

HUMANITIES:

BA English (Hons) is now available again after withdrawals in colleges such as Hans Raj College and Kalindi College. It has, however, closed at Lady Shri Ram College (LSR), Ramjas College, and Maitreyi College under the fifth list.

The cutoffs for English (Hons) has also dropped by upto 3.5% points. The highest cutoff for English is at Miranda House, where the cutoff requirement is 95.75%, which is 0.5% points lower than that of the fourth list.

For History aspirants, seats have become available in the fifth list after withdrawals at colleges such as Kamala Nehru College, and the cutoff has dropped by up to 4% points. The highest cutoff for History is at LSR, which is the same as that in the fourth list, at 96.25%.

Seats for Political Science are also available at certain colleges such as Kamala Nehru College, Gargi College, and Ramjas College. Though the cutoff has dropped by up to 3% points, it has not dropped by more than a mark or two in most sought-after colleges that still have seats available. Ramjas has the highest cutoff with a requirement of 94.75%, which is only 0.25% points lower than the fourth list.

BA Programme is closed at most well known colleges. However, some such as IP College, Ramjas College, and Miranda House have a few seats remaining, with a cutoff requirement of 88.5%, 91.5%, and 93.25% respectively.

SCIENCES:

Chemistry (Hons) is still available at colleges like Gargi, Kalindi, and Hans Raj. However, the cutoff requirements have not dropped by more than 1% point.

IP College, Gargi, and Kamala Nehru have reopened admissions to Mathematics (Hons) after withdrawals.

New highlights of school education in Pune: Going beyond rote learning, including those left behind & using technology

If the number of schools is any indication, then the education sector in the city has seen nearly 100 per cent growth in the last two decades. From 2,626 schools affiliated to the state board of education in 2004, to 3,405 schools in 2017, the number has seen a sharp rise. Add to that, over 95 CBSE schools and 36 ICSE and ISC schools today — there were less than 30 schools earlier — and the establishment of about 10 IB board affiliated schools after 1997.

Educationists say that the methodology and outlook towards imparting education has changed significantly.

Around the same time the city saw the setting up of more international and non-state board affiliated schools, the concept of making learning interesting through classroom activities became popular, and even the state board realised the need to revamp its style. A programme of teachers’ training was put in place to make learning ‘joyful’, said Suman Shinde, former deputy director of education. Education is no longer only about imparting textbook knowledge, but it is about moving beyond the text.

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From rote learning to experiential learning

Devyani Mungali, an educationist whose career spans several decades, remembers how 20 years ago, teachers would restrict themselves to teaching what was in the textbooks, emphasising on retention value of the subject matter for students.
“At that time, teachers were the sole source of information. As English teachers, we concentrated on the writing skill of students and comprehension… most of it was functional learning. Even evaluations were based on textbook material… learning was mostly rote-based. Over the last few years, with exposure to technology and ICT material, the teachers’ role changed from being the sole giver of knowledge to being a facilitator. During this time, the syllabus started undergoing changes and so did the evaluation patterns… Students were scored on their skills and projects… they started seeking knowledge beyond textbooks that was encouraged by new marking patterns,” she said.

Devika Nadig, an educationist, said she feels that teacher-capacity building has been the most important change in the last few decades. “While a lot of people talk about ICT, a decade ago, corporates and others began looking at the way schools were run. One of the things revealed in the studies was that we rely heavily on rote memorisation… that perlocated down to teaching, as it was simply to memorise and the assessment was based on how the students could recall. The gamechanger was moving children to application-based learning… The other wave that came in around this time was the international schools – IB and other boards… As school education got more expensive, parents became consumers, earlier they demanded only marks, now they demand better teaching,” she said.

Introduction of technology in classrooms

However, educationists agree that one policy that has led to a sea change in the school education sector and transformed it completely is the integration of technology into classroom teaching. From state government projects to identify tech-savvy teachers to initiatives by private schools to introducing smart boards or tablets, integration of ICT into school education is the reality of today.

Lakshmi Kumar, director of The Orchid School, says that in the last two decades, one of the major changes in classroom teaching has been the introduction of smart boards, laptops, tablets with pre-loaded content, and introduction of YouTube into tutorials. “… Today, with ICT-enabled classrooms, a 40-minute explanation can be done in 10 minutes. Conceptual doubts are easier to resolve as students can be engaged through digital content and shown things practically. We have an opportunity now to move to the next step of the learning process, beyond mere recall and retention of concepts, to application and analysis… Even government-run Zilla Parishad schools are part of this digital evolution …,” she said.

Technology has also changed the relationship between parents and schools. Stating that school administrations have gained hugely from the use of technology, Kumar pointed out different ways of how it worked.; like instantly reaching out to parents, sharing information via e-circulars, and more.

RTE, regulatory laws and child-centric policies

Educationists unanimously agree that if there was one law that changed the way schools function, it was the introduction of the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education. On one hand, it opened a window for quality education for all by reserving 25 per cent seats for students from low-income families; on the other hand, it also introduced child-centric policies like stricter laws on corporal punishment. “Until RTE was introduced, people viewed only physical harm to a student as child rights violation. But RTE mandated that no child could be mentally harassed…” said Shinde.

Shinde said it was the Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan, which became operational around 2001, which started off the process before the RTE Act. “Through that programme, schools which were dilapidated or had no classrooms or toilets started getting funds, improving their condition,” she said.

Inclusive education

Another parallel movement working towards inclusion was trying to bring students with special needs into mainstream education. Not only did the RTE Act mandate a non-discriminatory policy, but various school boards rose to the occasion by introducing a slew of concessions. “In the late 1990s, if you had a special child, very few schools would dare to admit them… Now, with the concessions by boards, the RTE rules and general awareness among schools, the scenario is far better…,” added Kumar.

Do those who abused Oxford student for solving JEE paper need to get their IQ checked?

The violent reaction to a third-year UK university student ’s online post that he “ breezed” through a Joint Entrance Exam or JEE question paper (entrance test for engineering colleges in India), in “a third of the allowed time, and with 100% correct answers,” leaves no doubt that the cyber world is overpopulated by creatures with a singular lack of intelligence.

Jack Fraser, a third-year physics student at a top university in the UK, was at the receiving end of vicious online harassment after he reportedly solved the JEE paper on being requested on the online question and answer platform Quora to solve it.

Fraser had taken pains to explain that he was a third-year student attempting the paper “for a laugh” as it was meant for 17-year-old students much younger than him, straight out of schools. So those who hit back at him obviously did not comprehend English or simply did not have the IQ to understand what he meant.

The JEE is just an exam for entrance to engineering colleges in India. Period. Does it spoil some vast eternal plan if it’s solved in 30 minutes instead of three hours?

Those who hit back at the third-year student of physics in a top college in UK obviously did not comprehend English or simply did not have the IQ to understand what he meant.

Anyone personally affronted by someone else simply solving a question paper of an exam (no matter how important) should be seriously worried about his or her health and take an appointment with a psychologist to pinpoint the reason for this misplaced outrage.

They can also join nursery classes to relearn English, develop a sense of humour to take things lightly and try not to get offended by harmless Quora posts – especially ones not intended to offend.

Also, those who issue death threats or send out obscene pictures to others expose themselves in more ways than one. They make it evident that theirs is a sad, dark little world which has robbed them completely of the ability to think, behave or understand the consequence of their actions.

Students get gift of 32 digital channels from HRD ministry, big help for those in remote areas

New Delhi President Pranab Mukherjee has launched two programmes, Swayam and Swayam Prabha, to take education to the remotest corners of the country with the help of technology. Swayam Prabha will tap the potential of Direct to Home Service allowing a person to install a dish antenna for about Rs 1,500 and have access to 32 digital educational channels run by the HRD Ministry.

Mukherjee also launched a National Academic Depository where verified educational records will be digitally stored by universities or a board to counter forgery. He was speaking at the inauguration of three digital initiatives in the education sector – Swayam, Swayam Prabha and National Academic Depository by the ministry of human resource development (HRD) on Sunday

The programmes for making education more accessible, and the depository, have been conceived and executed by the HRD ministry.

Under Swayam, courses will be offered through digital classrooms with online study material available free of cost in videos.

Students who want certification will have to be registered and then offered a certificate on the completion of the course for a nominal fee, the Swayam website states.

They will have the opportunity to raise queries which would be answered in real time, HRD minister Prakash Javadekar said.

Digital learning

Students would be assessed through proctored examination and the marks/grades secured in this exam would be transferred to their academic record, according to the website.

The Direct to Home Service there will be new content for at least four hours which will be repeated five times in a day, allowing students to choose the time of their convenience, additional secretary in UGC Pankaj Mittal said.

The course content will cover almost every aspect of education in various fields from class nine and will include preparatory courses for institutes such as the IITs.

Speaking on the occasion, Mukherjee said he had always emphasised on the “quality” of teaching and learning process in higher educational institutions.

He said mere physical expansion might provide access but without physical infrastructure and quality teachers, “the talent which is hidden in the young minds would not get the opportunity to blossom”.

The president also said there were huge differences in the quality of education in urban and rural areas, between the states and in educational institutions within a state.

Underlining the need for making quality study material available in regional languages, he said pupils studying in regional mediums in schools found it difficult when material for higher education was in an alien language.

In his address, Javadekar highlighted the importance of teachers as the function was organised on “Guru Purnima”.

Thanking the president for gracing the occasion, Javadekar said Mukherjee, who started his career as a teacher, had an unblemished public life for the last 48 years.

As a mark of respect on Guru Purnima he presented Mukherjee with a gift, which included a “slate” — a traditional writing tablet.

Javdekar said that speeches made by the president during convocations of various universities would be compiled in various languages and distributed in the varsities.

The Diet Behind All of Those Crazy Instagram Transformation Photos

If you’re among Renaissance Periodization’s (RP) 160,000 Instagram followers, you’re familiar with the company’s signature before-and-after photo testimonials. On the left, a bathroom mirror selfie of a reasonably in-shape guy. On the right, 12 weeks later, it’s the same guy in the same bathroom, but now he’s sporting chiseled abs and legs like tree trunks. The hashtag #RPTransformations is the only clue to what happened.

Nick Shaw, one of the company’s founders, credits the pedigree of his staff for the program’s undeniable track record. While Shaw, formerly a personal trainer in New York City, started the company with a fellow trainer, RP employs over a dozen registered dietitians and Ph.D.-level sports nutritionists to create their diet plans and products, which include one-on-one coaching packages, customized diet templates, ebooks on strength training, live seminars, and cookbooks.

According to Shaw, the Renaissance Diet Auto Template, a customized, multi-tabbed Excel workbook priced at $109, is their most popular product. “What we did — and we were pretty much the first people to ever do this — we built a product that scales diet coaching,” he says.

Each customer receives an individualized diet plan tailored to their gender, current weight, and whether their primary goal is to lose fat or gain muscle. All plans start with a two-week “Base” period designed to acclimate the user to the program, which accounts for meals and snacks by macronutrients, or “macros,” a.k.a. carbohydrate, protein, and fat. Depending on the user’s goals, the Base phase is followed by a “Cut” or “Mass” period that adjusts calorie consumption for weight loss or muscle gain. Users choose from an included list of “acceptable foods,” which eliminates trans fats, fast food, and most processed food. Shaw explains that while the Cut and Mass phases are not sustainable, many customers settle into the final “Maintenance” phase, using it as a tool for long-term meal planning.

“When we started off, we were almost strictly working with competitive athletes,” says Shaw. RP now caters to a wider audience, but there’s still an expectation of precision. Beyond portions and macro counting, the diet templates factor in both activity level and nutrient timing. For example, the diet plan for a day that includes a light workout, like a yoga class or 30 minutes on the elliptical, will include fewer calories than the meal plan for two hours of weightlifting and high-intensity interval training. And the time of day the user hits the gym will dictate when they’ll consume the majority of their quick-burning carbohydrates.

For the average guy who’s interested in bringing more structure to his diet, but isn’t quite ready to go all-in on macro counting, Shaw has a few tips:

  • Start the day with a vegetable omelet (fill it with broccoli, spinach, or any leftover sides from the night before) and a side of fruit. The carbs in the fruit and vegetables will give you quick-burning energy, while the protein and fat in the eggs will help hold you over until your lunch or pre-workout snack.
  • Pre-workout fuel should be high in carbs, but don’t just reach for the nearest sugar-loaded energy bar. Low-fat Greek yogurt with berries is just as carbo-loaded, and it’s far more nutritious.
  • We all love a burger now and then, but leaner meats like chicken, turkey, and fish are better daily protein options. They include less saturated fat, a potential contributor to high cholesterol.
  • Dining out? Yes, you relinquish some control when you’re not preparing your own meal, but you don’t have to go completely off the rails. Remember that one serving of protein is about the size of your fist, so don’t house half a brick of chicken just because it’s on your plate. Also, whole grains like wild rice, quinoa, and farro are nutritional powerhouses, but if your entrée comes with a refined starch like white rice or pasta, ask if you can sub in a salad or double up on veggies.