DU fucchas ready to spend 30K to 50K to look their best on day one

Delhi University’s new academic session kick-starts tomorrow, and freshers, it seems, don’t want to miss a chance to look their best on day one. Such is the craze to make the perfect first impression that some of them are willing to spend upto `50000 for it.

From clothes to shoes and looks to gadgets, the freshers are spending anywhere between Rs 30,000 to Rs 50000. “Getting into DU is a dream-come-true for me. I want to look perfect on my first day, therefore, I have asked my designer to stitch me something chic. I have also asked her to come up with three other dresses that I plan to wear in the first week of DU,” says Sakshi Sharma, who has got admission in Kirori Mal College.

From picking  chic dresses to expensive gadgets, fucchas are spending extra money to look perfect on day one in college.

City designers admit that they are thronged by fucchas looking for designer looks. “College students are the one who at times start a trend. They want stylish yet comfortable clothes and this time round, the girls are asking mostly for dhoti capes, flashy shirts and stylish printed pants. The boys are opting for a complete denim look — both shirts and pants in denim fabric. The price for such designerwear for girls and boys ranges between Rs 7000 to Rs 50000, depending on the fabric and design,” says Urvashi Jain, spokesperson of designer Naina Jain.

City salons are also flooded with a gamut of requests from students. Akansha Verma, manager at Cut and Style Saloon in Kamla Nagar Market, says, “We are working extra hours because of the rush. Most of our customers are girls, and each one of them come with a unique request. While some are asking for neon hair, others want curls with highlights. Cost of hair colouring starts from Rs 4000 and can go up to Rs 10000. Also, we have different offers, to attract as many students as possible.”

A similar rush is visible at other parlours too, courtesy the offers. Shweta Kushwaha, manager at Kuts and Kandy in Hudson Lane, says, “During admission season, we offer various discounts for the students. For them, it’s really important to look nice on day one.”

As girls perfect their looks, boys are going gaga over high-end gadgets. Ajay Aggarwal, owner of a mobile phone shop, says, “Students want a phone that has a good selfie camera. They don’t mind spending Rs 30000 but the gadget has to be something that they can show off.”

Do those who abused Oxford student for solving JEE paper need to get their IQ checked?

The violent reaction to a third-year UK university student ’s online post that he “ breezed” through a Joint Entrance Exam or JEE question paper (entrance test for engineering colleges in India), in “a third of the allowed time, and with 100% correct answers,” leaves no doubt that the cyber world is overpopulated by creatures with a singular lack of intelligence.

Jack Fraser, a third-year physics student at a top university in the UK, was at the receiving end of vicious online harassment after he reportedly solved the JEE paper on being requested on the online question and answer platform Quora to solve it.

Fraser had taken pains to explain that he was a third-year student attempting the paper “for a laugh” as it was meant for 17-year-old students much younger than him, straight out of schools. So those who hit back at him obviously did not comprehend English or simply did not have the IQ to understand what he meant.

The JEE is just an exam for entrance to engineering colleges in India. Period. Does it spoil some vast eternal plan if it’s solved in 30 minutes instead of three hours?

Those who hit back at the third-year student of physics in a top college in UK obviously did not comprehend English or simply did not have the IQ to understand what he meant.

Anyone personally affronted by someone else simply solving a question paper of an exam (no matter how important) should be seriously worried about his or her health and take an appointment with a psychologist to pinpoint the reason for this misplaced outrage.

They can also join nursery classes to relearn English, develop a sense of humour to take things lightly and try not to get offended by harmless Quora posts – especially ones not intended to offend.

Also, those who issue death threats or send out obscene pictures to others expose themselves in more ways than one. They make it evident that theirs is a sad, dark little world which has robbed them completely of the ability to think, behave or understand the consequence of their actions.

What's Your Child's IQ? Higher the Score, Longer May Be Their Life

IQ or Intelligent Quotient is a test of series which usually determines what’s an individual’s thinking capacity, or how smart he or she is. In standard IQ tests, the system of scoring is such that the raw median score is defined as 100. Most people score between IQ 75 to IQ 125. About 5 per cent people score above IQ 125, who are considered to be very intelligent, and 5 per cent score below IQ 75, who are less than average. Einstein is said to have had an IQ score of 160-190. According to a new study, IQ is also linked to one’s long life. The scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden found that higher IQ in childhood is associated with a lower lifetime risk of major causes of death, including heart disease, stroke, smoking related cancers, respiratory disease and dementia.


Further, lifestyle, especially tobacco smoking, can be an important component in the effect of intelligence on differences in mortality, the researchers said.


“The study confirms that intelligence test scores in childhood are significantly associated with subsequent mortality. Importantly, it shows that childhood IQ is strongly associated with causes of death that are, to a great extent, dependent on already known risk factors,” said Daniel Falkstedt, Assistant Professor at the Karolinska Institutet in Sweden.

child smart

Higher IQ in childhood is associated with a lower lifetime risk

“Tobacco smoking and its distribution along the socioeconomic spectrum could be of particular importance here. It remains to be seen if this is the full story or if IQ signals something deeper, and possibly genetic, in its relation to longevity,” Falkstedt added.


For the study, published in the journal The BMJ (British Medical Journal), the team of researchers from the University of Edinburgh examined the association between intelligence test scores measured at age 11 and leading causes of death in men and women up to age 79.


Their findings are based on data from 33,536 men and 32,229 women born in Scotland in 1936, who took a validated childhood intelligence test at age 11, and who could be linked to cause of death data up to December 2015.