DTE Maharashtra CAP round 3 allotment 2017: Vacant seats list to release at dtemaharashtra.gov.in

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Directorate of Technical Education (DTE) Maharashtra will release the list of vacant seats available for CAP round 3 today. Candidates who have applied for admission to various engineering courses in the state can check the official website to check how many seats are available and at various colleges.

The directorate had on July 25 released the provisional allotment list for CAP round 3 and had directed those who qualified to report to the ARC from July 25 and July 28 to confirm their seats. The admission process started in June for about 1.3 lakh engineering and 36,000 pharmacy seats after the Higher Secondary Certificate (HSC) class 12 results were declared.

The allotment list for admission to these seats are prepared based on the results of Maharashtra Health and Technical Common Entrance Test (MHT CET) 2017. Read | DTE Maharashtra releases engineering CAP round 3 allotment list 2017, click here

Steps to download DTE Maharashtra CAP 3 engineering allotment 2017 vacant seat list:

– Go to the official website for DTE Maharashtra (dtemaharashtra.gov.in)

– Click on the link for the CAP 3 engineering allotment 2017 vacant seat list.

– Download the results and take a print out for further reference.

Mumbai University result delay: Students fear losing year, jobs, overseas seats

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A FINAL-YEAR engineering student, who has been selected for a Masters in Business Administration course in the UK, has spent the past two weeks making rounds of the University of Mumbai, writing applications for an early declaration of results lest she lose the seat. “I had to submit my marksheets to the UK university by August 1. I have been requesting the University of Mumbai to see if the results could be declared confidentially to the UK university directly,” said the student, who spent all of Monday inside a newly set up confidential reports cell in the university. She was among a dozen students who had turned up at the cell with similar requests.

The university’s inability to deliver the results of final-year students in time has left thousands of such students in the lurch. From uncertainty over future admissions, job rejections and the inability to meet deadlines, students have had a tumultuous couple of months. Although the deadline for releasing results was July 31, there are around 2.9 lakh answer papers yet to be corrected.

Suraj Vishwakarma, an MSc student of Birla College, Kalyan, said, “I applied to an IT giant for a job, but they could not give me a definite decision because my results have not been declared. They said that if there are no vacancies left by the time results are declared, I will not get the job. I am very stressed at this moment as I don’t want to lose this opportunity.”

Another student, who did a BA in French from MU, has been selected at the University of Edinburgh for a Masters in Film Studies but she has not been able to go ahead with her admission process. She now fears she might have to drop a year.

Some have even resigned to taking a year drop instead of applying and losing out on admissions. “I have decided to postpone my plans to study abroad only because I have not got my results. It is very annoying and stressful,” said Yesha Mehta, a BMS student.

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This year, the university decided to assess final-year papers through an onscreen system. However, the system was hastily implemented following a delay, leading to a delay in declaration of results. Of the 477 exams held in March and April this year, the results of 160 have been declared so far. The university has now not only missed the 45-day deadline set by the Maharashtra Public Universities Act but also the July 31 deadline set by Governor and Chancellor Ch Vidyasagar Rao.

While several students are worried of a year drop, a debate over the quality of assessment has left students concerned over discrepancies in results. “The entire assessment process has been so badly organised and has taken so long, my main worry is that in the rush, my papers will not be corrected properly,” said Bhakti Sonawala, a BCom student from Lala Lajpatrai College. The results will now be declared by August 5.

 

Delhi University’s special admission drive to fill up vacant reserved seats

Officials said some colleges still have seats in the reserved categories, including SC, ST, OBC, Person with Disability (PwD), Children/Widows of Armed Forces, sports and extracurricular activities (ECA).

Delhi University will conduct a special admission drive for applicants under the reserved categories and bring out two more cutoffs for about 1,500 seats.

Officials said some colleges still have seats in the reserved categories, including SC, ST, OBC, Person with Disability (PwD), Children/Widows of Armed Forces, sports and extracurricular activities (ECA).

“There are some seats left in the reserved categories so we are running a special drive to make sure students are admitted on these seats,” said a university official.

The cutoff list for the special category will be out on August 3 and August 7.

But this opportunity will only be available for applicants who are already registered with the university and filled the online registration forms.

“Under this drive only such candidates would be considered for admission who are registered with the University of Delhi, but are not admitted in any college irrespective of category under any cut-off list. It is to be noted that no fresh registrations shall be allowed in this special drive,” said Tarun Das, DU registrar.

Registered applicants will also be allowed to make corrections related to the category change from unreserved to any other category which they belong to.

“Corrections related to category changes are allowed from UR to SC/ST/OBC /PWD /KM/CW subject to verification of original certificates,” Das said in a statement.

Admission committee chairman M K Pandit said, “The idea is to get those students into the university net who are registered but couldn’t seek admission for minor mistakes/choices they made at the time of filling an application.”

Applicants can make corrections by visiting room number 1 at the conference centre in North Campus with their relevant certificates from Monday till Wednesday.

“The applicants must bring their registration form and original/copies of relevant certificates. No further requests of correction will be accepted after these dates,” an official said.

For sports category applicants not admitted in any college, request for modification in colleges or course in sports or ECA admission will be allowed.

DU started the academic session from July 20 and released the seventh cutoff for all categories on July 26.

Delhi University colleges announce fifth cutoff, 10% seats left for those yet to make the cut

Delhi University colleges released the fifth cutoff list for admissions on Monday, which saw most sought-after colleges close admissions to popular course choices.

With only about 10% of the seats still up for grabs, the cutoffs for the few seats that are still available at these colleges for the some of the more popular course choices has not dipped by more than a mark or two.

COMMERCE AND ECONOMICS:

Economics (Hons) has seen a dip of upto 3.5% points at Lakshmibai College, but is closed for admissions at most sought-after colleges such as Hans Raj College, and Indraprastha College for Women (IP College) in the fifth list. However, few seats have now become available at colleges such as Kirori Mal College (KMC) after withdrawals, where the cutoff is set at 96.5%.

Seats are still available at colleges like Ramjas College, Daulat Ram College, and Hindu College. Hindu College has set the highest cutoff for the course at 97.25%, which is the same as that in the fourth list.

Under the fifth list, BCom (Hons) has now closed at Ramjas College and Sri Venkateswara as well. However, the seats are still available at IP College, Gargi, Kamala Nehru and others. Most well known colleges have not reduced their cutoffs by more than 0.5% points.

Seats are still available at colleges like Ramjas College, Daulat Ram College, and Hindu College. Hindu College has set the highest cutoff for the course at 97.25%, which is the same as that in the fourth list.

HUMANITIES:

BA English (Hons) is now available again after withdrawals in colleges such as Hans Raj College and Kalindi College. It has, however, closed at Lady Shri Ram College (LSR), Ramjas College, and Maitreyi College under the fifth list.

The cutoffs for English (Hons) has also dropped by upto 3.5% points. The highest cutoff for English is at Miranda House, where the cutoff requirement is 95.75%, which is 0.5% points lower than that of the fourth list.

For History aspirants, seats have become available in the fifth list after withdrawals at colleges such as Kamala Nehru College, and the cutoff has dropped by up to 4% points. The highest cutoff for History is at LSR, which is the same as that in the fourth list, at 96.25%.

Seats for Political Science are also available at certain colleges such as Kamala Nehru College, Gargi College, and Ramjas College. Though the cutoff has dropped by up to 3% points, it has not dropped by more than a mark or two in most sought-after colleges that still have seats available. Ramjas has the highest cutoff with a requirement of 94.75%, which is only 0.25% points lower than the fourth list.

BA Programme is closed at most well known colleges. However, some such as IP College, Ramjas College, and Miranda House have a few seats remaining, with a cutoff requirement of 88.5%, 91.5%, and 93.25% respectively.

SCIENCES:

Chemistry (Hons) is still available at colleges like Gargi, Kalindi, and Hans Raj. However, the cutoff requirements have not dropped by more than 1% point.

IP College, Gargi, and Kamala Nehru have reopened admissions to Mathematics (Hons) after withdrawals.

IIT-JEE counselling: About 421 seats vacant in engineering institutes after round 5

After five rounds of seat allocation at Indian Institutes of Technology, one seat – at IIT Bhubaneswar – remained unclaimed. Close to 421 seats were vacant across all engineering institutes.

In the latest round, which ended on Sunday, about 69 seats from various IITs allotted in previous rounds and not accepted by students were reassigned. Most of the seats were from IIT-Kharagpur, IIT (BHU) Varanasi, Indian School of Mines (ISM) Dhanbad and IIT-Tirupati, among others.

All seats were taken up in IIT-Bombay after the second round of allotment.

“Since students are allowed to withdraw admissions till the sixth round, many seats remain vacant still. We have two more rounds after this and hopefully there will be no vacancy this year,” said an official from the Joint Entrance Examination-Advanced (JEE-Adv) office.

About 69 seats from various IITs  allotted in previous rounds and not accepted by students have been reassigned in the fifth round of counselling.

This is the third year when Joint Seat Allocation Authority (JoSAA) is conducting admissions for IITs, National Institutes of Technology (NITs), Indian Institutes of Information Technology (IIITs) and other Government Funded Technical Institutes (GFTIs).

About seven rounds of seat allotment will take place this year. Last year, 76 seats remained vacant across IITs after six rounds.

“No withdrawal of admission will be allowed in the seventh and final round, and we hope no seats will remain vacant till then,” an official from JoSAA said. The sixth and seventh round of seat allotment will be announced on July 18 and July 21, respectively.

After the fifth round of allocation, close to 421 seats still remain vacant across all institutes, including one in IIT-Bhubaneswar. About the latter, a JoSAA official said,“This particular seat is in the Scheduled Tribe (ST) category and there seems to be no candidate eligible for the seat anymore, therefore it is not being allotted.”

There are 36,208 seats available across 97 institutes including all IITs, NITs, IIITs as well as GFTI (Government Funded Technical Institutes) . Of these 10,988 seats are in IITs.

SGPC’s medical college: Confusion over turning Punjab govt seats into management quota

With just a day remaining in counselling for MBBS and BDS courses in Punjab, confusion prevails over whether or not the government will allow Sri Guru Ram Das Medical College (SGRDC), Amritsar, to convert all 75 government quota MBBS seats into management quota on account of its being a Sikh minority institute run by the Shiromani Gurdwara Parbandhak Committee (SGPC).

Eligible candidates will appear for counselling at Baba Farid University of Health Sciences (BFUHS) on Monday.

The SGRDC has 150 seats: 75 in government quota and 75 in management/minority quota. The fee for minority/management quota is around Rs 40 lakh for the fiveyear course, which is four times the cost of a seat in the general government quota. On July 1, it announced to scrap government quota, and put all seats under management quota.

Officials from the state government discussed the issue at a meeting in Chandigarh on Friday evening, but no decision was announced. Dr Raj Bahadur, vice-chancellor of the BFUHS, had earlier said, “We can’t accept the proposed division of seats until the institute gets the approval of the ministry concerned.” Harjit Singh, director of public instructions (DPI), colleges, didn’t respond to the text messages and calls.

SGRD has 150 seats, with 75 in the government (general) quota and 75 in the management/minority quota.

An education department official told HT on the condition of anonymity, “SGRDC will definitely get the status of a medical university sooner or later, but cannot charge fee as per its will. They (SGRDC) initially sought to charge Rs 62 lakh for MBBS! But the fee has to be as per the Punjab Private Health Sciences Educational Institutions Act, 2006. Though the official decision is yet to come, it may not be allowed to scrap its government quota this session.”

Parents have been seeking clarity. Naveen Sehgal from Bathinda said, “I am not sure if my child can seek a government quota seat in the SGRDC as they are claiming to have converted all the seats to management quota which are really expensive.”

Geeta Sharma, principal of the college, did not take calls.

PRESENT POSITION, AND POSSIBILITIES

If the SGRDC is allowed to scrap the government/general quota, those having no reservation or those who are not in the NRI quota will not get admission at the institute.

Already, 75 seats in the government quota had 12 seats reserved for NRIs. Of the 63 seats left, 25 are reserved for Scheduled Castes, Backward Classes and physically handicapped candidates.

DU admissions: Just 10% seats left, popular colleges finalising intake for courses

Admissions to merit-based undergraduate courses under the fourth cutoff list at Delhi University closed on Saturday, with admissions approved to almost 90% of the seats.

This may have been the last chance for many to get admitted to popular course choices in sought after colleges at DU, as many of them will be closing admissions to these courses.

DU has around 56,000 seats in its 60-odd constituent colleges, of which 50,000 seats are for merit-based undergraduate courses. Admissions to these seats are based on cutoffs .

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

According to DU officials who are part of the admission process, almost 3,500 seats had been filled in the latest round of admissions, leaving only about 10% of the seats still vacant.

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

Colleges such as Sri Venkateswara College have already admitted students beyond capacity. “We have approximately 1,150 seats, and we have approved 1,198 admissions. Almost all the courses will be closed for admissions, especially under the general category, in the next list,” said P Hemalatha Reddy, the principal.

Ramjas College too expects to close admissions to most of its courses, as they have less than 100 seats remaining at their institution. Kirori Mal College too has claimed that the fourth list would have been the last chance for many applicants, as most popular course choices will be closed.

However, Daulat Ram College claimed they still had around 150 seats remaining. “Even in sought after courses such as BCom, BCom (hons) and English (hons), we have a few seats remaining,” said Savita Roy, the principal.

For sciences, students may want to look to Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Khalsa College. “We have filled approximately 570 out of our 800 seats. Though most courses are going to be closed, we still have seats in the science courses,” said an associate professor.

The next cutoff list is expected to be released on Tuesday.

With only 10% seats remaining, popular DU colleges closing admissions to most courses

Admissions to merit-based undergraduate courses under the fourth cutoff list at Delhi University closed on Saturday, with admissions approved to almost 90% of the seats.

This may have been the last chance for many to get admitted to popular course choices in sought after colleges at DU, as many of them will be closing admissions to these courses.

DU has around 56,000 seats in its 60-odd constituent colleges, of which 50,000 seats are for merit-based undergraduate courses. Admissions to these seats are based on cutoffs .

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

According to DU officials who are part of the admission process, almost 3,500 seats had been filled in the latest round of admissions, leaving only about 10% of the seats still vacant.

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

Colleges such as Sri Venkateswara College have already admitted students beyond capacity. “We have approximately 1,150 seats, and we have approved 1,198 admissions. Almost all the courses will be closed for admissions, especially under the general category, in the next list,” said P Hemalatha Reddy, the principal.

Ramjas College too expects to close admissions to most of its courses, as they have less than 100 seats remaining at their institution. Kirori Mal College too has claimed that the fourth list would have been the last chance for many applicants, as most popular course choices will be closed.

However, Daulat Ram College claimed they still had around 150 seats remaining. “Even in sought after courses such as BCom, BCom (hons) and English (hons), we have a few seats remaining,” said Savita Roy, the principal.

For sciences, students may want to look to Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Khalsa College. “We have filled approximately 570 out of our 800 seats. Though most courses are going to be closed, we still have seats in the science courses,” said an associate professor.

The next cutoff list is expected to be released on Tuesday.

TN to appeal against Madras HC order to not reserve MBBS, BDS seats for state board students

Chennai The Tamil Nadu government will appeal against Friday’s Madras High Court’s (HC) decision to quash the Tamil Nadu government order to reserve 85% medical (MBBS) and dental (BDS) seats in undergraduate colleges for state board students. The admissions are being done on the basis of scores of a common entrance test, National Eligibility cum Entrance Test (NEET).

State health minister C Vijayabaskar said the government would appeal against the single judge order . His government was opposed to NEET to protect the interests of the students from Tamil Nadu and that was why reservation was notified. “We are still against NEET and our bills are awaiting assent of the President,” he said.

The state government had through a notification rolled out the reservations last month. A mention of the same was made in the brochures issued for admissions to various undergraduate medical courses in state colleges.

The Madras High Court has reportedly quashed a Tamil Nadu government order reserving 85% of MBBS and BDS seats for state board students

Disposing of a petition challenging the June 22 notification of the state government filed by a minor, C Darnish Kumar, a CBSE student, Justice K Ravichandra Babu directed the medical colleges to consider the petitioner for all the seats available for undergraduate courses in medicine in the state for the academic year 2017-18.

The petitioner had challenged the notification saying that only the Medical Council of India (MCI) had the power to regulate medical college admissions as per the provisions of the Indian Medical Council Act. The MCI had stipulated that admissions to medical courses would be based on the marks obtained in NEET and merit lists prepared on the basis of such marks and that it did not distinguish between students from CBSE and the state board.

Justice Ravichandra Babu held that the impugned reservation was bad in law and violated Art 14 of the Constitution (Equality before law). He also held that the reservation indirectly meddled with the object and process of the NEET and compromised on merits of selection.

The judge directed authorities to prepare a fresh merit list and conduct the counselling for admissions accordingly.

The state government has not been in favour of NEET. It had submitted to the court that two of its bills, passed in the state assembly exempting students from NEET, were pending with the President for assent. The advocate general (AG) of Tamil Nadu also told the HC that 88,431 students appeared for NEET, out of which only 4,675 were from CBSE. “Since NEET is the basis of admission, to ensure fair and equal opportunity to candidates from different boards, such reservation is provided in the seats available in the State quota,” the AG said.

Justice Reddy refused to accept the state government pleas and quashed the notification providing for reservations to Tamil Nadu board students in medical college undergraduate courses.

Delhi University: 10,000 seats still left after first day of admissions under fourth cutoff list

Admissions to around 79% of seats in Delhi University had been approved by the end of the first day of enrolment under the fourth cutoff list.

With only a little over 20% seats still up for grabs, admissions to popular honours courses such as Economics, English and BCom had been closed at many popular colleges. Seats are fast filling even at the colleges where seats are still available and students may need to rush before Saturday to secure a place.

DU has around 56,000 seats for undergraduate courses at its 60-odd constituent colleges, of which around 50,000 are for merit-based undergraduate courses. A little over 10,000 seats were still up for grabs at various colleges.

By Thursday, admissions to 39,495 seats had been confirmed. 36,836 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm, said DU officials who work with the admissions committee.

The Non Collegiate Women’s Education Board (NCWEB) had also released its third cutoff list along with the fourth list for regular colleges. Of the 12,500 seats available for NCWEB, admissions had been approved to 2,408 seats.

Seats are still available at colleges such as Gargi, Hindu, Ramjas, Lady Shri Ram College, Miranda House, and others.

Ramjas College has approximately 100 seats left. Seats are still available for honours programmes in Political Science, Economics, English and History. Students who have scored 96.5% or more may be able to secure BA (hons) Economics seat at Ramjas.

 DU has around 56,000 seats for undergraduate courses at its 60-odd constituent colleges, of which around 50,000 are for merit-based undergraduate courses. A little over 10,000 seats were still up for grabs at various colleges.

LSR has seats still available for courses such as Psychology, Journalism, English, and History. “We have filled approximately 590 out of the available 700 seats,” said Suman Sharma, principal.

Miranda House, had faced over-admission for Chemistry (hons) programme during the third cutoff. But they still have seats available in four courses, including BA programme and BA (hons) English.

“We have been more busy with ECA admissions… We have around 30 seats for sports and 20 for ECA. We reserve 5% supernumerary seats for Sports and ECA combined. We have more seats for sports as sports is specialised and ECA talent is widespread across colleges anyway,” said Pratibha Jolly, principal of Miranda House.

Students who have sought admissions under the Extra Curricular Activities quota, and have made it to the merit list, will be notified of the colleges’ admission list on Friday. Students then will have Saturday and Monday to get their admission confirmed at the colleges concerned.