Delayed results: B Pharm students miss transfer deadline, may not get into colleges of preference

The delay in declaration of results at Savitribai Phule Pune University (SPPU) has affected scores of second-year pharmacy students, who may lose out on the chance to get admission into colleges of their choice. According to students, the results of the first-year Bachelor of Pharmacy (B Pharm) courses were released on July 26. The Directorate of Technical Education (DTE) allows first-year students to switch colleges in the second year, as transfer cases.

However, B Pharm students who had received their first-year results on July 26, said when they approached other colleges for transfers, they were turned away and told that they have “missed the deadline”. “There has been a delay in declaration of results at the university’s end, but we have to suffer. The result was apparently sent to our college late in the evening on July 25. Since the office had closed, we got it the next day. But when my friends and I approached a college to get admission, we were told that the deadline for taking transfer admissions was only till July 27, and now we are not eligible. We don’t understand how can they expect us to finish all the procedure in just one day?” asked a college student at Pimpri-Chinchwad.

Another student, who was aspiring to get admission at Indira College of Pharmacy, said he had even visited the DTE offices in Pune and Mumbai with his queries, but to no avail. “We were told that the admission calendar is set by the DTE several months in advance. Now, it is the turn of students under the Centralised Admission Process (CAP) to get admissions,” he added.

Many principals, meanwhile, said they have been inundated with students’ queries over the last few days.

“We have received many queries from students. Actually, the students got only one day for transfer, which has led to this confusion. It’s unfortunate. But second year admissions also take place through CAP. Students under CAP get direct admission in the second year after having passed a diploma in pharmacy. Their registrations are done, so it would be unfair to them as well,” said Dr Ashwini Madgudkar, principal, AISSMS College of Pharmacy.

Principals of pharmacy colleges said this year the delay in declaration of results has been rather long. “The exams got over in the last week of May. Generally, the results come by the end of June or first week of July. However, this year, the results are over three weeks late. But this problem is not restricted to Pune, many universities across the state are facing the same issues,” said P D Chaudhari, principal, Modern College of Pharmacy.

DTE officials also expressed inability to help the transfer students at this point of time. “The schedule was decided much in advance, accordingly the list of vacancies was declared. Student registrations were taken for direct admissions through CAP under second year. The deadline for transfer admissions is over. Now, after the CAP process is over, if seats are left over, those will be allotted to transfer cases,” said Dayanand Meshram, joint director of technical education, Maharashtra.

 

Parents, beware. 3 hours of TV daily may up risk of diabetes in your kids

Being glued to television or video games for more than three hours a day may put your children at increased risk of developing diabetes.

Parents, take note! Being glued to television or video games for more than three hours a day may put your children at increased risk of developing diabetes, a study warns. Researchers found that both adiposity, which describes total body fat, and insulin resistance, which occurs when cells fail to respond to insulin, were affected by longer hours of watching television and using computers.

“Our findings suggest that reducing screen time may be beneficial in reducing type 2 diabetes risk factors, in both boys and girls, from an early age,” said Claire Nightingale, research fellow at St George’s, University of London in the UK.

Researchers based their findings on a sample of nearly 4,500 nine to 10-year-old pupils from 200 primary schools in London, Birmingham and Leicester. The children were assessed for a series of metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors, including blood fats, insulin resistance, fasting blood glucose levels, blood pressure and body fat.

Around a third of the children spent less than an hour of screen time a day, but 28% of the children said they clocked up one to two hours; 13% said their tally was two to three hours; and 18% said they spent more than three hours looking at screens every day.

The study noted that there was a trend between levels of screen time and higher levels of leptin, the hormone that controls appetite. (Shutterstock )

Trends emerged between screen time and ponderal index – an indicator of weight in relation to height, and skinfolds thickness and fat mass index – indicators of total body fat. Researchers found that these levels were all higher in children reporting more than three hours of daily screen time than in those who said they spent an hour or less on it.

The team also noted that there was a strong trend between levels of screen time and higher levels of leptin, the hormone that controls appetite, and insulin resistance. The trends remained significant even after taking account of potentially influential factors, including physical activity levels, researchers said.

Ladies, having a baby in your 30s may ensure a long life for you

Women who conceive later in life tend to be well-off and educated and have healthier lifestyle, leading to longer life expectancies.

Looks like people, who are planning their family late, may breathe a sigh of relief. Earlier research said, conceiving after 30 may leave a first-time mother childless. But a new study, not only denies the fact, but also brings a good news for the older moms.

The study, by scientists at Portugal’s Coimbra University, said that women who became mothers later in life were more likely to live longer than those who gave birth in their teens and 20s, reports the Independent. “The most relevant result shows that women tend to live longer the older they are when they get pregnant (in particular, for the first child),” it said, according to a paper published in the Journal of Public Health.

Of several factors which determine women’s life expectancy, it said, “The most surprising factor is the age of women at pregnancy, which may provide evidence to promote pregnancy in the early 30s.” A second study, published in the journal menopause Menopause journal, also found that mothers, who gave birth at 33 or older, were three times more like to have certain DNA markers for longevity than mothers who gave birth younger.

But neither study provided an explanation as to why older mothers may live longer. The report further said that according to fertility expert Lord Winston, women who conceive later in life tend to be well-off and educated and have healthier lifestyle, leading to longer life expectancies.

ICAI IPCC May 2017 result likely to be declared today

ICAI is likely to declare the result of the Chartered Accountants Intermediate Integrated Professional Competence examination on Tuesday.

The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India (ICAI) is likely to declare the result of the Chartered Accountants Intermediate (Integrated Professional Competence) examination on Tuesday at around 6pm. The examination was held in May 2017.

The result as well as the merit list (candidates securing a minimum of 55% and above marks and upto the maximum of 50th Rank on all India basis) will be available on the official website: icaiexam.icai.org.

Students who have registered for getting their results on their e-mail addresses will be provided the same through e-mail immediately after the declaration of the result.

Candidates can check their results on the official website by clicking here. icaiexam.icai.org

Key in your registration number or PIN number along with roll number to access the result.

candidates can also know their results with marks on SMS. The service will be available through India Times.

For getting results through SMS candidates should type:

CAINTER(Space)XXXXXX (where XXXXXX is the six digit Intermediate (IPC) Examination roll number of the candidate) eg CAINTER 302971 and send the message to 58888 – for all mobile services – India Times.

 

ICAI IPCC May 2017 result likely to be declared tomorrow

ICAI is likely to declare the result of the Chartered Accountants Intermediate Integrated Professional Competence examination on Tuesday.

The Institute of Chartered Accountants of India (ICAI) is likely to declare the result of the Chartered Accountants Intermediate (Integrated Professional Competence) examination on Tuesday at around 6pm. The examination was held in May 2017.

The result as well as the merit list (candidates securing a minimum of 55% and above marks and upto the maximum of 50th Rank on all India basis) will be available on the official website: icaiexam.icai.org.

Students who have registered for getting their results on their e-mail addresses will be provided the same through e-mail immediately after the declaration of the result.

Candidates can check their results on the official website by clicking here. icaiexam.icai.org

Key in your registration number or PIN number along with roll number to access the result.

candidates can also know their results with marks on SMS. The service will be available through India Times.

For getting results through SMS candidates should type:

CAINTER(Space)XXXXXX (where XXXXXX is the six digit Intermediate (IPC) Examination roll number of the candidate) eg CAINTER 302971 and send the message to 58888 – for all mobile services – India Times.

 

How we believe meat is raised may influence its taste: Study

meat taste beliefs, factory farm meat taste unpleasant, beliefs influence taste, humane farm meat taste

Our beliefs about how animals are raised – whether on ‘factory farms’ or in more humane conditions – can shape our meat eating experience and influence its taste, a new study has found.

Researchers from Northeastern University in the US paired identical meat samples with different descriptions and then reported on participants’ eating experiences.

They found that meat samples paired with descriptions of animals raised on factory farms looked, smelled and tasted less pleasant to study participants than meat samples paired with descriptions of animals raised on humane farms.

Participants’ beliefs also influenced their perceived flavour of the meat and the amount of meat they consumed, suggesting that beliefs can actually influence eating behaviour.

The findings align with an emerging body of research that shows that our beliefs can influence how we evaluate food.

Wine, for instance, tastes better if we think it is expensive – even if the fine vintage we have been told we are drinking is really a cheap knock-off from a corner store, researchers said.

“We show that what you feel very directly influences not only how you interpret what you see but also very literally what you see,” said Lisa Feldman Barrett from Northeastern University.

“We call this ‘affective realism’ – the tendency of your feelings to influence the actual content of your perceptual experience,” said Barrett.

The findings suggest that anyone interested in creating things, from a chef to a filmmaker to a designer should consider how beliefs influence the user experience.

In the first experiment, study participants were asked to consume two identical samples of organic beef jerky, each of which was paired with a different label describing a different kind of farm on which cattle were raised.

Researchers found that study participants ranked the factory farmed meat sample as less pleasant along all measured consumption categories, including appearance, smell, taste and overall enjoyment.

In the second experiment, each study participant sampled only one of four identical roast beef samples, each of which was paired with a newly created description.

The third experiment tested whether beliefs about how animals are raised can influence basic sensory properties of flavor, including perceived saltiness and sweetness.

Researchers found that the descriptions influenced the flavour ratings of the ham sample.

Participants reported that factory farmed ham tasted saltier, greasier, and less fresh than humanely raised ham.

“Beliefs are really powerful. Words are really powerful.They influence what you do, often in surprising ways,” said Barrett.

The findings were published in the journal PLoS ONE.

Eat your leafy vegetables and eggs. It may help keep your brain healthy

Kale with poached eggs; both contain the nutrient lutein which helps in cognitive function.

Fill up on all those leafy vegetables. A research by the University of Illinois finds a difference in cognitive function between younger and middle-age participants with higher and lower lutein levels. Lutein is a nutrient that the body can’t make on its own but it can be acquired through diet. As well as green leafy vegetables such as spinach and kale, it is also found in foods such as avocados and eggs.

Most previous studies have looked at lutein levels in older adults, after there has already been a period of cognitive decline, however the new study recruited 60 participants aged 25 to 45. “As people get older, they experience typical decline. However, research has shown that this process can start earlier than expected. You can even start to see some differences in the 30s,” said Anne Walk, first author of the paper, adding, “We want to understand how diet impacts cognition throughout the lifespan. If lutein can protect against decline, we should encourage people to consume lutein-rich foods at a point in their lives when it has maximum benefit.”

To measure levels of the nutrient in the participants the researchers looked at the participants’ eyes, where lutein accumulates in the tissue, asking them look into a scope and respond to a flickering light. While the participants performed a task to measure their attention, the researchers used electrodes on the scalps to measure neural activity in the brain.

The results showed that, “The neuro-electrical signature of older participants with higher levels of lutein looked much more like their younger counterparts than their peers with less lutein,” explained Walk, adding that, “Lutein appears to have some protective role, since the data suggest that those with more lutein were able to engage more cognitive resources to complete the task.”

“Now, there’s an additional reason to eat nutrient-rich foods such as green leafy vegetables, eggs and avocados,” said Naiman Khan, a professor of kinesiology and community health at Illinois, adding, “We know these foods are related to other health benefits, but these data indicate that there may be cognitive benefits as well.” The findings can be found published online in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.

 

Study shows breastfeeding may reduce the risk of Multiple Sclerosis in women

Mothers who breastfeed for at least 15 months over one or more pregnancies may be 53 per cent less likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) compared with those who do not breastfeed at all or do so for up to four months, a study has claimed.

MS is a disease in which the immune system eats away at the protective covering of nerves. The findings showed that women with MS have significantly fewer relapses, or attacks, during pregnancy or while they are breastfeeding exclusively.

“Among the many other benefits to the mother and the baby, breastfeeding may reduce the mother’s future risk of developing MS,” said Annette Langer-Gould from Kaiser Permanente Southern California. In addition, women who were age 15 or older at the time of their first menstrual cycle were 44 per cent less likely to develop MS later than women who were 11 years old or younger at the time of their first menstruation.

The total number of years a woman ovulated and other factors, such as number of pregnancies, use of hormonal contraceptives and age at first birth were not associated with risk of MS, the researchers said, in the paper published in the journal Neurology.

“Other health benefits include a reduced risk of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, Type 2 diabetes and heart attack,” Langer-Gould said. For the study, the team involved 397 women with an average age of 37 who were newly diagnosed with MS or its precursor, clinically isolated syndrome, who were compared to 433 other women.

Language lessons for your baby may start in womb: Study

Love to speak to your unborn baby? Well he or she can typically distinguish the difference between sounds used in various languages even a month before being born, an interesting study has shown. The study showed that foetuses can hear things, including speech, in the womb, although the voice is muffled.

In the study, the foetal heart rates changed when they heard the unfamiliar, rhythmically distinct language (Japanese) after having heard a passage of English speech, while their heart rates did not change when they were presented with a second passage of English instead of a passage in Japanese.

“The results suggest that language development may indeed start in the womb. Foetuses are tuning their ears to the language they are going to acquire even before they are born, based on the speech signals available to them in utero,” said lead author Utako Minai, associate professor from the University of Kansas.

“Pre-natal sensitivity to the rhythmic properties of language may provide children with one of the very first building blocks in acquiring language,” Minai added.

For the study, published in the journal NeuroReport, the team examined 24 women, averaging roughly eight months pregnant. Minai had a bilingual speaker make two recordings, one each in English and Japanese — argued to be rhythmically distinctive language, to be played in succession to the foetus.

“The intrauterine environment is a noisy place. The foetus is exposed to maternal gut sounds, her heartbeats and voice, as well as external sounds.

“Without exposure to sound, the auditory cortex wouldn’t get enough stimulation to develop properly. This study gives evidence that some of that development is linked to language,” explained Kathleen Gustafson, a research associate professor at the varsity.

Just a minute’s running daily may boost bone health

Want to improve your bone health? Running — a high-intensity and weight-bearing physical activity — for just one to two minutes each day may help you, new research shows.

The findings showed that women who on an average did 60-120 seconds of running per day had four per cent better bone health than those who did less than a minute, while those who ran for more than two minutes a day, had six per cent better bone health.

“We don’t yet know whether it’s better to accumulate this small amount of exercise in bits throughout each day or all at once, and also whether a slightly longer bout of exercise on one or two days per week is just as good as 1-2 minutes a day,” said lead author Victoria Stiles from the University of Exeter. But the research, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, showed a clear link between this kind of high-intensity, weight-bearing exercise and better bone health in women.

“It seems likely that just 1-2 minutes of running a day is good for bone health,” Stiles said.

Good bone health has multiple health benefits, including a reduced risk of bone diseases like osteoporosis and fractures in old age. For the study, the team looked at data on more than 2,500 women, and compared activity levels (measured by wrist-worn monitors) with bone health (measured by an ultrasound scan of heel bone). For people interested in increasing their day-to-day levels of activity, Stiles recommended increasing walking activity first.

“Further on, we would suggest adding a few running steps to the walk, a bit like you might if you were running to catch a bus,” Stiles noted.