DU admissions 2017: Varsity to release 8th and 9th cut off for reserved category

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University of Delhi has announced the special drive for reserved/ quota applicant category (SC/ST/OBC/PWD/CW/KM) including sports/ ECA for admissions to merit-based undergraduate programme. In this special drive, only those candidates would be considered for admission who are registered with Delhi University but are not admitted in any college irrespective of the category under any cut-off list.

DU has said no fresh registrations shall be allowed in this special drive.  The varsity has said corrections related to category changes are allowed from UR to SC/ST/OBC /PWD /KM/CW subject to verification of original certificates.

For the sports category applicants who are not admitted to any college, their request for modification in colleges/ course in sports/ ECA admission shall be permitted by the Delhi University. The corrections will be allowed from July 31, 2017 to August 2 at room number 1, Conference Center, Gate No. 4, North Campus.

Note: The applicants have to bring their registration/application form and original/copies of relevant certificates.

Moreover, the eighth cut off for the special category will be declared on August 3 and the admission process will continue till August 4. DU will release the ninth cut off on August 7 and the admission will start on August 8.

Cut funding to 28 DU colleges, Manish Sisodia tells finance department

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The Delhi government Monday directed that disbursement of funds to 28 government-funded colleges in Delhi University be stopped. The move comes after the university failed to appoint governing bodies for the colleges, despite receiving 11 communications in the last 11 months as well as a warning. The governing body supervises and controls affairs of the college, and also handles its funds. It has members suggested by both the Delhi government and the university. Once constituted, it would give the Delhi government a say in the matters of the college through its appointed members.

In a series of tweets, Education Minister and Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia said he “cannot allow unchecked corruption and irregularities to be sustained on Delhi government funds in the name of education” and added that he has ordered the finance department to stop funding the 28 colleges. Earlier, Sisodia had described the delay in appointing governing bodies in colleges as “farcical” and “deliberate”. Last Tuesday, he had directed the Director (Higher Education) to communicate to the university that “all funds from government of NCT of Delhi shall be stopped if the governing bodies are not constituted by July 31, 2017”. Sisodia had also directed the Principal Secretary (Finance) to stop the fund unless “written communication was received from (the) directorate of higher education (stating) that governing bodies have been constituted”.

On Monday, the Delhi government maintained that they have written to the Delhi University 11 times since last September on the issue. In his directions to the education department in July this year, Sisodia described the sequence of events as “too much of a coincidence”, especially when the process of recruiting ad hoc and regular teachers was going on. He added that it was “absolutely farcical” that the university, after a delay of five months, was “now setting up a committee to review the panel of names sent by…itself”.

Meanwhile, the AAP had alleged that the Delhi University administration, under pressure from the Centre, had deliberately not constituted governing bodies of the 28 colleges that are fully or partially aided by the Delhi government. While 12 are fully funded, the government provides five per cent grant to the 16 others. The remaining 95 per cent is given by the UGC. However, Devesh Sinha, DU’s Dean of Colleges, said, “We discussed the matter with Sisodia ji’s office Monday morning. The list of governing body members that we get from the Delhi government goes to DU’s Executive Council, to make sure there is a healthy mix of educationists, lawyers, journalists, etc in each governing body. But since our V-C and other top officials are occupied with the Law Faculty interviews, there has been some delay in the process. The matter will be sorted in a few days; they can’t cut funding.”

S K Garg, principal of Deen Dayal Upadhyay College, which gets 100 per cent funding from the Delhi government, said this was a matter between the university and the government. “The college cannot do anything in this. If our funds are cut, we’ll shut the college. What else can we do?” he said.

DU admissions: NCWEB seventh cut off released

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The Delhi University’s Non-Collegiate Women’s Education Board (NCWEB) on July 31 released seventh cut off list at du.ac.in. In a press release, the varsity has said, “Admissions will be done on 1 and 2nd August between 9.30  am and 1.30 pm at its respective teaching centres.” Among the colleges, the highest cut-off has been demanded by the Lakshmi Bai College for its BA programme (70 per cent) and at Satyawati College for B Com.

Even in the  NCWEB had released its sixth cut-off list on July 26 in which Lakshmi Bai College had announced the highest cut-off of 73 per cent for B A programme.

In the fifth cut-off too, Lakshmi Bai College and Jesus and Mary college had asked for 74 per cent for BA Programme and BCom respectively. The next highest cut off was at JDM and Miranda House at 72 per cent for BA programme.

In the merit-based admissions, the varsity has already released the seventh cut-off for the reserved category students. Most of the colleges have closed admissions for general and SC category students for BA programme, whereas admissions for OBC and ST are still open in many colleges.

The NCWEB is a non-formal system of obtaining a degree from the Delhi University with lectures being delivered only on the weekends. Only women students residing in the National Capital Territory of Delhi can enrol themselves as students of the Board.

DU fucchas ready to spend 30K to 50K to look their best on day one

Delhi University’s new academic session kick-starts tomorrow, and freshers, it seems, don’t want to miss a chance to look their best on day one. Such is the craze to make the perfect first impression that some of them are willing to spend upto `50000 for it.

From clothes to shoes and looks to gadgets, the freshers are spending anywhere between Rs 30,000 to Rs 50000. “Getting into DU is a dream-come-true for me. I want to look perfect on my first day, therefore, I have asked my designer to stitch me something chic. I have also asked her to come up with three other dresses that I plan to wear in the first week of DU,” says Sakshi Sharma, who has got admission in Kirori Mal College.

From picking  chic dresses to expensive gadgets, fucchas are spending extra money to look perfect on day one in college.

City designers admit that they are thronged by fucchas looking for designer looks. “College students are the one who at times start a trend. They want stylish yet comfortable clothes and this time round, the girls are asking mostly for dhoti capes, flashy shirts and stylish printed pants. The boys are opting for a complete denim look — both shirts and pants in denim fabric. The price for such designerwear for girls and boys ranges between Rs 7000 to Rs 50000, depending on the fabric and design,” says Urvashi Jain, spokesperson of designer Naina Jain.

City salons are also flooded with a gamut of requests from students. Akansha Verma, manager at Cut and Style Saloon in Kamla Nagar Market, says, “We are working extra hours because of the rush. Most of our customers are girls, and each one of them come with a unique request. While some are asking for neon hair, others want curls with highlights. Cost of hair colouring starts from Rs 4000 and can go up to Rs 10000. Also, we have different offers, to attract as many students as possible.”

A similar rush is visible at other parlours too, courtesy the offers. Shweta Kushwaha, manager at Kuts and Kandy in Hudson Lane, says, “During admission season, we offer various discounts for the students. For them, it’s really important to look nice on day one.”

As girls perfect their looks, boys are going gaga over high-end gadgets. Ajay Aggarwal, owner of a mobile phone shop, says, “Students want a phone that has a good selfie camera. They don’t mind spending Rs 30000 but the gadget has to be something that they can show off.”

HC to hear plea seeking ‘priority admission’ for Delhi students in DU

New Delhi: The Delhi High Court (HC) will continue hearing a plea on Monday seeking priority in admission criteria for Delhi domiciled students in Delhi University (DU).

Response on this matter has already been sought from the DU vice chancellor (VC).

The HC on May 24 had issued a notice to the Centre, the Delhi government and DU on a plea seeking preference in admission to DU students who were Delhi domiciled.

The HC on May 24 had issued a notice to the Centre, the Delhi government and DU on a plea seeking preference in admission to DU students who were Delhi domiciled.

Member of Parliament from Delhi Parvesh Verma and Delhi assembly member Manjinder Singh Sirsa had met DU VC Yogesh Tyagi on May 17 and informed him about Delhi students being forced to pay large sums of money for admission to private universities as they were unable to join DU .

The two political leaders urged Tyagi to fix a 70 % quota for Delhi students or give at least 3 to 5% grace marks to Delhi students as it was “their constitutional right to be able to have access to higher education at a reasonable cost.”

Earlier even AAP had urged the VC to look into a similar proposal, but it was then rejected by the university.

Sirsa, a newly elected Rajouri Garden MLA, had earlier in a statement had said that students from neighbouring states were getting seats in Delhi colleges solely ‘due to the liberal markings’ while their Delhi counterparts were unable to do so ‘due to the strict marking system’.

DU admissions: Just 10% seats left, popular colleges finalising intake for courses

Admissions to merit-based undergraduate courses under the fourth cutoff list at Delhi University closed on Saturday, with admissions approved to almost 90% of the seats.

This may have been the last chance for many to get admitted to popular course choices in sought after colleges at DU, as many of them will be closing admissions to these courses.

DU has around 56,000 seats in its 60-odd constituent colleges, of which 50,000 seats are for merit-based undergraduate courses. Admissions to these seats are based on cutoffs .

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

According to DU officials who are part of the admission process, almost 3,500 seats had been filled in the latest round of admissions, leaving only about 10% of the seats still vacant.

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

Colleges such as Sri Venkateswara College have already admitted students beyond capacity. “We have approximately 1,150 seats, and we have approved 1,198 admissions. Almost all the courses will be closed for admissions, especially under the general category, in the next list,” said P Hemalatha Reddy, the principal.

Ramjas College too expects to close admissions to most of its courses, as they have less than 100 seats remaining at their institution. Kirori Mal College too has claimed that the fourth list would have been the last chance for many applicants, as most popular course choices will be closed.

However, Daulat Ram College claimed they still had around 150 seats remaining. “Even in sought after courses such as BCom, BCom (hons) and English (hons), we have a few seats remaining,” said Savita Roy, the principal.

For sciences, students may want to look to Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Khalsa College. “We have filled approximately 570 out of our 800 seats. Though most courses are going to be closed, we still have seats in the science courses,” said an associate professor.

The next cutoff list is expected to be released on Tuesday.

Delhi University (DU) takes steps to ensure ragging-free campus

New Delhi With the academic year about to begin, the Delhi University has taken a slew of measures to ensure ragging-free and disciplined campus.

At a proctorial meeting with officials of the DTC, Delhi Metro and the Delhi police held on Friday, decisions to make the campuses women-friendly were also taken.

The university will set up two control rooms in North and South campus from July 20 to August 2 for easing the induction process of the freshers.

The Delhi police will deploy women police personnel in plain clothes in the varsity premises to curb ragging or eve- teasing incidents, a release issued by the university said.

Delhi university will set up two control rooms in north and South campus from July 20 to August 2 for easing the induction process of the freshers. Seen here, students last year introducing themselves to seniors.

All colleges will get police picket points with a special assistance to women colleges. Besides, all eating joints on the campus will be under extra vigil.

“The Delhi Metro has been requested to make announcements in trains and stations about the varsity being intolerant towards ragging,” the release said.

Defacing of walls with graffiti and sensitive posters, unauthorised entry of outsiders to hostels have been prohibited, according to the release.

Sensitive areas in the campus have been put under electronic surveillance as a measure to curb ragging and maintain discipline.

Ragging can be reported to on national anti-ragging helpline 1800 180 5522 or the North Campus control room (27667221) or on South Campus number 24119832.

With only 10% seats remaining, popular DU colleges closing admissions to most courses

Admissions to merit-based undergraduate courses under the fourth cutoff list at Delhi University closed on Saturday, with admissions approved to almost 90% of the seats.

This may have been the last chance for many to get admitted to popular course choices in sought after colleges at DU, as many of them will be closing admissions to these courses.

DU has around 56,000 seats in its 60-odd constituent colleges, of which 50,000 seats are for merit-based undergraduate courses. Admissions to these seats are based on cutoffs .

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

According to DU officials who are part of the admission process, almost 3,500 seats had been filled in the latest round of admissions, leaving only about 10% of the seats still vacant.

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

Colleges such as Sri Venkateswara College have already admitted students beyond capacity. “We have approximately 1,150 seats, and we have approved 1,198 admissions. Almost all the courses will be closed for admissions, especially under the general category, in the next list,” said P Hemalatha Reddy, the principal.

Ramjas College too expects to close admissions to most of its courses, as they have less than 100 seats remaining at their institution. Kirori Mal College too has claimed that the fourth list would have been the last chance for many applicants, as most popular course choices will be closed.

However, Daulat Ram College claimed they still had around 150 seats remaining. “Even in sought after courses such as BCom, BCom (hons) and English (hons), we have a few seats remaining,” said Savita Roy, the principal.

For sciences, students may want to look to Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Khalsa College. “We have filled approximately 570 out of our 800 seats. Though most courses are going to be closed, we still have seats in the science courses,” said an associate professor.

The next cutoff list is expected to be released on Tuesday.

DU admissions: 15,000 seats on offer in fourth cutoff list, check details here

Delhi University will start the admission process for the remaining 15,000 seats under the fourth cutoff list from Thursday with admission to honours courses such as Economics, English and BCom being closed at many popular colleges.

The cutoff has dropped by up to 5% points in popular courses and some colleges have reopened admissions in courses such as History, Economics, English and Political Science.

Commerce and Economics

Economics was closed for admission at 14 colleges, including Kirori Mal College (KMC), Kamla Nehru College (KNC), Lady Shri Ram (LSR), Miranda House, Sri Venkateswara, and SGTB Khalsa.

But 23 colleges, including Hindu, Hans Raj and Ramjas will continue with admission for Economics.

Four colleges, including Shyama Prasad Mukherji and PGDAV have reopened admissions in the course after withdrawals.

BCom is closed for admission at 15 colleges, including Hans Raj, Hindu, KMC, and LSR. But at 39 colleges, including Ramjas, Sri Venkateswara, and Indraprastha College for Women, admissions in the course will continue. Kalindi College has reopened admission to BCom at 92%.

Shri Ram College of Commerce had closed admission for both the courses by the second cutoff list.

Humanities

Admission to English has been closed at 11 colleges including Hansraj, Hindu, KNC, KMC, and Sri Venkateswara. But admission is open at 35 colleges including LSR, Miranda House, and Ramjas. Cutoff for English has dropped by up to two percentage points.

Gargi College and Satyawati Evening College has reopened the course for admissions under the fourth list.

Around 18 colleges including Gargi, Hindu, KNC and Miranda House have closed admission to History. But 22 colleges including KMC, Hansraj, Ramjas and Sri Venkateswara will continue with admission in the course.

The course has seen a drop of up to 3% points and it has reopened for admission at colleges such as Daulat Ram College and LSR.

Admission to Political Science is over at 28 colleges including Hindu, KMC, LSR, and Miranda House. But at 25 colleges including Ramjas and Sri Venkateswara, the admissions will continue. KNC has reopened admission in the course.

Some colleges such as Gargi have reopened it for admission for BA programme.

Sciences

The cutoff for Chemistry, which is open for admission at 12 colleges, has dropped by up to 1% point, with highest dips at Dyal Singh College and Zakir Husain Delhi College. Hans Raj College has maintained their cutoff at 95.66%, same as third list.

The highest dip for Mathematics, which is available for admission at 22 colleges, was at Lakshmibai College, where it dropped by 1.25% points from 93.5%. It has re-opened for admission at six colleges including Kalindi, ARSD, and Dyal Singh College.

The cutoff for Physics dropped by two percentage points and it has re-opened for admissions in two colleges including Kalindi.

The non-collegiate women’s education board (NCWEB) also released its third cutoff list on Wednesday. The lowest cutoff for BA Programme and BCom was at Aditi Mahavidyalaya at 68% and 76% respectively.

The highest cutoff for both the courses was at Miranda House at 86% . Admissions are on at all 26 NCWEB centers.

Female applicants from Delhi NCT were supposed to be automatically eligible for NCWEB seats, however, some students had inadvertently unchecked NCWEB as an option.

As a relief to these students, the DU has now said that all female students who have applied for BA Programme and BCom courses for regular colleges will be considered for admission to NCWEB.

HC order could delay further admissions, frets DU

New Delhi: A day after the Delhi High Court said that the ongoing Delhi University admissions could be impacted by the outcomes of a plea in the court and the results of the re-evaluation of CBSE Class 12 answer sheets, DU officials are concerned about how their “sacrosanct” number of seats and the calendar will be affected by the impending orders.

A senior DU official, who wished to remain unnamed as the matter is still sub judice, said that students who have already taken admission at the university and its 60-odd constituent colleges need not worry. “The issue is about students who are still seeking admission according to the latest order. Students who have already been admitted to DU colleges will not have their admissions cancelled, even if their marks get reduced after re-evaluation,” said the official.

For students who may have their grades increased, DU officials said that they will follow the current admission guidelines, unless ordered otherwise by the high court.

As for students who may have their grades increased, DU officials said that they will follow the current admission guidelines, unless ordered otherwise by the court. “According to our current guidelines, if a student clears a particular cutoff, but fails to take admission under that list, he/she may do so on the last day of admission under the subsequent cutoffs, given that there are still seats available,” said a DU official who works with the admissions committee.

However, as the High Court order makes references to previous directives, where it was ordered that the university must accept students irrespective of availability of seats and admission schedules, have left many officials worried.

“The sacrality of the DU calendar is supreme. It is our unique selling point (USP). Even the number of seats as set by the academic council and the executive council is sacrosanct. This would go for a toss, and our admission procedures will get delayed,” said the DU admission committee member.

DU has approximately 56,000 seats this year.

DU officials also raised the question of why they are supposed to delay their admission procedures because of the Central Board of Secondary Education’s “tardiness,” when CBSE is only one of the 42 boards that represent the student community at DU.

Almost 80% of the students who apply to DU are CBSE students.

Educators, and school officials have welcomed the High Court order as “natural justice” for students.

“Children should not be made to suffer for something that is obviously not their fault. Their right to admission should not be denied because of ‘policy’,” said the principal of a prominent private school in Delhi.

The matter is now listed for further hearing on July 26, in the meantime, DU expects its admission procedures to go uninterrupted. Officials also said that in compliance with the High Court order, they will be sending copies of the writ petition to colleges to keep them informed of the pendency of the issue.