Delayed results: B Pharm students miss transfer deadline, may not get into colleges of preference

The delay in declaration of results at Savitribai Phule Pune University (SPPU) has affected scores of second-year pharmacy students, who may lose out on the chance to get admission into colleges of their choice. According to students, the results of the first-year Bachelor of Pharmacy (B Pharm) courses were released on July 26. The Directorate of Technical Education (DTE) allows first-year students to switch colleges in the second year, as transfer cases.

However, B Pharm students who had received their first-year results on July 26, said when they approached other colleges for transfers, they were turned away and told that they have “missed the deadline”. “There has been a delay in declaration of results at the university’s end, but we have to suffer. The result was apparently sent to our college late in the evening on July 25. Since the office had closed, we got it the next day. But when my friends and I approached a college to get admission, we were told that the deadline for taking transfer admissions was only till July 27, and now we are not eligible. We don’t understand how can they expect us to finish all the procedure in just one day?” asked a college student at Pimpri-Chinchwad.

Another student, who was aspiring to get admission at Indira College of Pharmacy, said he had even visited the DTE offices in Pune and Mumbai with his queries, but to no avail. “We were told that the admission calendar is set by the DTE several months in advance. Now, it is the turn of students under the Centralised Admission Process (CAP) to get admissions,” he added.

Many principals, meanwhile, said they have been inundated with students’ queries over the last few days.

“We have received many queries from students. Actually, the students got only one day for transfer, which has led to this confusion. It’s unfortunate. But second year admissions also take place through CAP. Students under CAP get direct admission in the second year after having passed a diploma in pharmacy. Their registrations are done, so it would be unfair to them as well,” said Dr Ashwini Madgudkar, principal, AISSMS College of Pharmacy.

Principals of pharmacy colleges said this year the delay in declaration of results has been rather long. “The exams got over in the last week of May. Generally, the results come by the end of June or first week of July. However, this year, the results are over three weeks late. But this problem is not restricted to Pune, many universities across the state are facing the same issues,” said P D Chaudhari, principal, Modern College of Pharmacy.

DTE officials also expressed inability to help the transfer students at this point of time. “The schedule was decided much in advance, accordingly the list of vacancies was declared. Student registrations were taken for direct admissions through CAP under second year. The deadline for transfer admissions is over. Now, after the CAP process is over, if seats are left over, those will be allotted to transfer cases,” said Dayanand Meshram, joint director of technical education, Maharashtra.

 

Delhi government cuts funding of 28 Delhi University colleges

Manish Sisodia, Delhi govt, AAP

The Delhi government today ordered a freeze on funding of 28 Delhi University colleges which are either fully or partially funded by it following the varsity’s failure to appoint governing bodies since months.

As first reported by The Indian Express on July 20, even after 11 communications in the past 11 months yielded no result, the Delhi government has directed that “all funds” to 28 government-funded colleges in Delhi University be stopped by August 1 unless the university constitutes governing bodies before that.

Deputy Chief Minister and Education Minister Manish Sisodia, while describing the delay as a “farcical” and “deliberate”. In a series of tweets, he said, “Hv ordered Fin Dept to stop funding for all Delhi gov funded 28 DU colleges, as DU not willing to hv governing bodies for last 10 months,” Sisodia said in a series of
tweets.

“I cannot allow unchecked corruption and irregularities to be sustained on Delhi govt funds in the name of education,” he added.

Earlier, the Delhi government had alleged that the varsity’s administration is under pressure from the Central government and therefore deliberately not constituting governing bodies of 28 colleges. While 12 of them are fully funded, the government provides 5 per cent grant to 16 others. The remaining 95 per cent is given by the University Grants Commission (UGC).

Delhi University Registrar Tarun Das, who is authorised to speak to media, remained unavailable for his comments on the issue.

Cut funding to 28 DU colleges, Manish Sisodia tells finance department

Manish Sisodia, Delhi Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia, Ramjas School, Ramjas School Principal, Delhi News, Indian Express, Indian Express News

The Delhi government Monday directed that disbursement of funds to 28 government-funded colleges in Delhi University be stopped. The move comes after the university failed to appoint governing bodies for the colleges, despite receiving 11 communications in the last 11 months as well as a warning. The governing body supervises and controls affairs of the college, and also handles its funds. It has members suggested by both the Delhi government and the university. Once constituted, it would give the Delhi government a say in the matters of the college through its appointed members.

In a series of tweets, Education Minister and Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia said he “cannot allow unchecked corruption and irregularities to be sustained on Delhi government funds in the name of education” and added that he has ordered the finance department to stop funding the 28 colleges. Earlier, Sisodia had described the delay in appointing governing bodies in colleges as “farcical” and “deliberate”. Last Tuesday, he had directed the Director (Higher Education) to communicate to the university that “all funds from government of NCT of Delhi shall be stopped if the governing bodies are not constituted by July 31, 2017”. Sisodia had also directed the Principal Secretary (Finance) to stop the fund unless “written communication was received from (the) directorate of higher education (stating) that governing bodies have been constituted”.

On Monday, the Delhi government maintained that they have written to the Delhi University 11 times since last September on the issue. In his directions to the education department in July this year, Sisodia described the sequence of events as “too much of a coincidence”, especially when the process of recruiting ad hoc and regular teachers was going on. He added that it was “absolutely farcical” that the university, after a delay of five months, was “now setting up a committee to review the panel of names sent by…itself”.

Meanwhile, the AAP had alleged that the Delhi University administration, under pressure from the Centre, had deliberately not constituted governing bodies of the 28 colleges that are fully or partially aided by the Delhi government. While 12 are fully funded, the government provides five per cent grant to the 16 others. The remaining 95 per cent is given by the UGC. However, Devesh Sinha, DU’s Dean of Colleges, said, “We discussed the matter with Sisodia ji’s office Monday morning. The list of governing body members that we get from the Delhi government goes to DU’s Executive Council, to make sure there is a healthy mix of educationists, lawyers, journalists, etc in each governing body. But since our V-C and other top officials are occupied with the Law Faculty interviews, there has been some delay in the process. The matter will be sorted in a few days; they can’t cut funding.”

S K Garg, principal of Deen Dayal Upadhyay College, which gets 100 per cent funding from the Delhi government, said this was a matter between the university and the government. “The college cannot do anything in this. If our funds are cut, we’ll shut the college. What else can we do?” he said.

About 28 Delhi University colleges to be audited over graft complaints: Deputy CM Manish Sisodia

Delhi University, DU admission, du.ac.in, du admission, DU corruption, du colleges, du, education news, indian express

Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia on Tuesday wrote to CAG demanding an audit of 28 Delhi University colleges, wholly or partially funded by the state government, after receiving complaints of corruption against them. The move comes a day after the Delhi government ordered a freeze on the funding of the 28 colleges following the varsity’s failure to constitute Governing Bodies (GBs) for over 10 months.

The Delhi University (DU) teachers, on the other hand, have written to Vice Chancellor Yogesh Tyagi, urging him to
complete the GB formation process so that students do not suffer due to funds freeze.

“Have written to CAG asking for comprehensive audit of 28 Delhi govt funded colleges, as I’ve received many complaints of corruption. 28 colleges need CAG audit as there are complaints of corruption; with no Governing Bodies for 10 months, there’s been no oversight,” Sisodia said in a series of tweets.

Sisodia, who is also the education minister, said, “It seems governing bodies have not been formed so that corruption and irregularities can go on. Public money cannot be wasted like this”. He also posted a letter from BJP MP Udit Raj on his Twitter handle, complaining of alleged irregularities in appointments to government funded colleges.

A college’s governing body comprises 15 members, out of which five are nominated by the state government. The body is responsible for taking several administrative decisions. Out of the 28 colleges, Maharaja Agrasen College,
BR Ambedkar College, Deen Dayal Upadhyaya College, Keshav Mahavidyalaya and Bhagini Nivedita College etc are wholly funded by the Delhi government.

The College of Vocational Studies, Rajdhani College, Shivaji College, Motilal Nehru College, Aurobindo College, Kalindi College and Shyama Prasad Mukherji College are among those partially funded by the state.

“The university is in the process of completing the formalities and soon the bodies will be formed,” a senior DU official said.

Manish Sisodia calls for CAG audit of 28 colleges: Cannot turn a blind eye to malpractices

Manish Sisodia, Delhi Deputy Chief Minister Manish Sisodia, Ramjas School, Ramjas School Principal, Delhi News, Indian Express, Indian Express News

“The government cannot turn a blind eye to… malpractices and irregularities potentially taking place in the 28 Delhi University colleges funded by it”, said Deputy Chief Minister and Education Minister Manish Sisodia in a letter to Shashi Kant Sharma, the Comptroller and Auditor General of India, while requesting a “comprehensive audit of these colleges”.

In the letter, Sisodia requested that the audit look at “all expenditure made by these colleges in the financial years 2016-17 and 2017-18”, “procedure of regular and ad-hoc appointments” and “regulatory and administrative action taken by DU (with respect to) these 28 colleges”. The letter added that the “audit is essential to ensure that there has been no misuse of public money”.

On Monday, the government had directed that all funds to the 28 government-funded colleges in DU be stopped, after the university failed to appoint governing bodies to these colleges despite 11 communications in the past 11 months.

In his letter, Sisodia wrote, “The oversight and monitoring of the procedures and expenditures in these colleges is done by the governing bodies. The term of the governing bodies ended in October last year. Since then, DU has been delaying the formation of these bodies, despite repeated correspondence.”

He added, “I have regularly been getting representations regarding corruption and irregularities in these colleges; including a letter from Udit Raj (MP, northwest Delhi) with details of irregularities in the appointment procedures in one these colleges…” Raj’s letter was also shared by Sisodia on social media outlets.

Dean of Colleges, Devesh Sinha, said, “I have not seen the letter demanding an audit, but any funding agency has the right to conduct audits. Even the Centre asks for such audits.”

The government’s order is already creating a flutter in the university, with the Delhi University Teachers’ Association (DUTA) writing to Sisodia as well as Vice-Chancellor Yogesh Tyagi.

In the letter to Sisodia, DUTA president Nandita Narain said, “DU has no right to delay the process or continue functioning with truncated governing bodies. We cannot accept such a harsh decision which penalises teachers and students for no fault of theirs.” DUTA has also appealed to Tyagi to urgently constitute the governing bodies.

Assam to appoint 877 teachers in colleges, schools in August

Assam government on Monday said it will appoint 877 teachers in schools and colleges across the state within next one week.

Assam government on Monday said it will appoint 877 teachers in schools and colleges across the state within next one week.

“We are going to appoint the teachers by August 7. Out of them, 105 teachers of five new colleges will receive appointment letters from the Chief Minister on August 4,” Assam Education Minister Himanta Biswa Sarma said at a press conference in Guwahati.

The new five government-run colleges has been set up in Behali, Dalgaon, Karimganj, Bongaigaon and Goalpara, he added.

Assam currently had only four government colleges — Cotton College, Diphu College, Haflong College and Kokrajhar College, of which Cotton has been transformed into an university.

“These will be model colleges and named after Pandit Deendayal Upadhyaya. The classes will begin immediately in these.

“Construction work for another seven model colleges are going on. As per the new education policy, government will set up all future educational institutes wherever there is a necessity,” Sarma said.

In next year, three more colleges will be set up in Karbi Anglong, Cachar and Nagaon, he added.

Sarma further said government will hand over appointment letters to 626 Headmasters and 146 Assistant Headmasters in high schools across the state on August 7.

“This will address a long pending issue of running high schools without any permanent headmaster,” he added.

The minister informed that 124 retired teachers have been appointed as special inspectors in as many schools, where pass percentage in latest metric examination was below 10%.

 

Assam to appoint 877 teachers in colleges, schools in August

Assam government on Monday said it will appoint 877 teachers in schools and colleges across the state within next one week.

Assam government on Monday said it will appoint 877 teachers in schools and colleges across the state within next one week.

“We are going to appoint the teachers by August 7. Out of them, 105 teachers of five new colleges will receive appointment letters from the Chief Minister on August 4,” Assam Education Minister Himanta Biswa Sarma said at a press conference in Guwahati.

The new five government-run colleges has been set up in Behali, Dalgaon, Karimganj, Bongaigaon and Goalpara, he added.

Assam currently had only four government colleges — Cotton College, Diphu College, Haflong College and Kokrajhar College, of which Cotton has been transformed into an university.

“These will be model colleges and named after Pandit Deendayal Upadhyaya. The classes will begin immediately in these.

“Construction work for another seven model colleges are going on. As per the new education policy, government will set up all future educational institutes wherever there is a necessity,” Sarma said.

In next year, three more colleges will be set up in Karbi Anglong, Cachar and Nagaon, he added.

Sarma further said government will hand over appointment letters to 626 Headmasters and 146 Assistant Headmasters in high schools across the state on August 7.

“This will address a long pending issue of running high schools without any permanent headmaster,” he added.

The minister informed that 124 retired teachers have been appointed as special inspectors in as many schools, where pass percentage in latest metric examination was below 10%.

Only 49 colleges have opted for NCC as elective subject:DG

NCC cadets being trained to operate guns at a combined army training camp (CATC) at Nagrota on the outskrits of Jammu. The director general  of NCC has urged northeastern states to select NCC as an elective subject in colleges.

Shillong Director General of the National Cadet Corps (NCC) Lt Gen Vinod Vashisht said on Tuesday that only 49 colleges in the country had opted for NCC their elective subjects.

The NCC chief has also urged state governments in the northeast region to take NCC as an elective subject in educational institutions.

“We have made plans and there are 49 colleges in our country that have opted for NCC as elective subject. Books are ready,” Lt Gen Vashist said during a two-day visit to Meghalaya.

Expressing regret that none of the state governments in the region had taken up the opportunity, he said, “If they do not want it, it is their call. It has happened in the last two years,” urging the state governments to make use of the opportunity.

The University Grants Commission (UGC) had issued a notification directing all universities to offer NCC as a subject in 2016 although NCC as an elective subject was first proposed in 2013 by the human resources development (HRD) ministry.

From the NCC point of view, offering NCC as an elective subject is seen as opportunity to woo students into its fold without them losing too many hours to attend NCC classes.

In its official syllabus, NCC will have a common service subject and specific subjects for the Army, Navy and Air Force for teaching and will be taken as a regular subject rather than an extracurricular one by the educational institutions.

An NCC officer, who did not wish to be named, said the state government was taking time to initiate this and was seeking legal opinion and other expert opinions on the matter.

Making NCC as an elective subject is expected to attract more students to join the organisation without worrying much about their academics, he said.

At present there are about 13.8 lakh cadets in the country and about 89,000 of them are enrolled in the entire northeast region alone.

With regards to the Youth Exchange Programme (YEP) the NCC used to have previously with Canada and other western countries, Lt Gen Vashisht said the NCC is conducting YEP programmes with 11 countries including its neighbour countries and from those in Central Asia and Russia.

“Our national interests do not lie in Canada but in the regional neighbourhood. We are having YEP programme with 11 countries now but in proximity to Central Asia, South East Asia and Russia,” he said

He said countries like Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Nepal, Bangladesh, Singapore and Vietnam are some of the countries the NCC are having the YEP with.

Delhi University colleges announce fifth cutoff, 10% seats left for those yet to make the cut

Delhi University colleges released the fifth cutoff list for admissions on Monday, which saw most sought-after colleges close admissions to popular course choices.

With only about 10% of the seats still up for grabs, the cutoffs for the few seats that are still available at these colleges for the some of the more popular course choices has not dipped by more than a mark or two.

COMMERCE AND ECONOMICS:

Economics (Hons) has seen a dip of upto 3.5% points at Lakshmibai College, but is closed for admissions at most sought-after colleges such as Hans Raj College, and Indraprastha College for Women (IP College) in the fifth list. However, few seats have now become available at colleges such as Kirori Mal College (KMC) after withdrawals, where the cutoff is set at 96.5%.

Seats are still available at colleges like Ramjas College, Daulat Ram College, and Hindu College. Hindu College has set the highest cutoff for the course at 97.25%, which is the same as that in the fourth list.

Under the fifth list, BCom (Hons) has now closed at Ramjas College and Sri Venkateswara as well. However, the seats are still available at IP College, Gargi, Kamala Nehru and others. Most well known colleges have not reduced their cutoffs by more than 0.5% points.

Seats are still available at colleges like Ramjas College, Daulat Ram College, and Hindu College. Hindu College has set the highest cutoff for the course at 97.25%, which is the same as that in the fourth list.

HUMANITIES:

BA English (Hons) is now available again after withdrawals in colleges such as Hans Raj College and Kalindi College. It has, however, closed at Lady Shri Ram College (LSR), Ramjas College, and Maitreyi College under the fifth list.

The cutoffs for English (Hons) has also dropped by upto 3.5% points. The highest cutoff for English is at Miranda House, where the cutoff requirement is 95.75%, which is 0.5% points lower than that of the fourth list.

For History aspirants, seats have become available in the fifth list after withdrawals at colleges such as Kamala Nehru College, and the cutoff has dropped by up to 4% points. The highest cutoff for History is at LSR, which is the same as that in the fourth list, at 96.25%.

Seats for Political Science are also available at certain colleges such as Kamala Nehru College, Gargi College, and Ramjas College. Though the cutoff has dropped by up to 3% points, it has not dropped by more than a mark or two in most sought-after colleges that still have seats available. Ramjas has the highest cutoff with a requirement of 94.75%, which is only 0.25% points lower than the fourth list.

BA Programme is closed at most well known colleges. However, some such as IP College, Ramjas College, and Miranda House have a few seats remaining, with a cutoff requirement of 88.5%, 91.5%, and 93.25% respectively.

SCIENCES:

Chemistry (Hons) is still available at colleges like Gargi, Kalindi, and Hans Raj. However, the cutoff requirements have not dropped by more than 1% point.

IP College, Gargi, and Kamala Nehru have reopened admissions to Mathematics (Hons) after withdrawals.

DU admissions: Just 10% seats left, popular colleges finalising intake for courses

Admissions to merit-based undergraduate courses under the fourth cutoff list at Delhi University closed on Saturday, with admissions approved to almost 90% of the seats.

This may have been the last chance for many to get admitted to popular course choices in sought after colleges at DU, as many of them will be closing admissions to these courses.

DU has around 56,000 seats in its 60-odd constituent colleges, of which 50,000 seats are for merit-based undergraduate courses. Admissions to these seats are based on cutoffs .

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

According to DU officials who are part of the admission process, almost 3,500 seats had been filled in the latest round of admissions, leaving only about 10% of the seats still vacant.

By Saturday evening, admissions had been approved to almost 45,000 of these seats, and almost 42,000 students had paid their admission fees by 6 pm.

Colleges such as Sri Venkateswara College have already admitted students beyond capacity. “We have approximately 1,150 seats, and we have approved 1,198 admissions. Almost all the courses will be closed for admissions, especially under the general category, in the next list,” said P Hemalatha Reddy, the principal.

Ramjas College too expects to close admissions to most of its courses, as they have less than 100 seats remaining at their institution. Kirori Mal College too has claimed that the fourth list would have been the last chance for many applicants, as most popular course choices will be closed.

However, Daulat Ram College claimed they still had around 150 seats remaining. “Even in sought after courses such as BCom, BCom (hons) and English (hons), we have a few seats remaining,” said Savita Roy, the principal.

For sciences, students may want to look to Sri Guru Teg Bahadur Khalsa College. “We have filled approximately 570 out of our 800 seats. Though most courses are going to be closed, we still have seats in the science courses,” said an associate professor.

The next cutoff list is expected to be released on Tuesday.